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#1 RayS

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 02:50 AM

Hi,
I connected the DSI I to my LXD75 10" for the first time and wasn't sure what to feel. I wanted to get a pic of Jupiter, put all I could get was a round, bright white flare. I had assumed after seeing pictures from others, that what I would see thru the camera would be similar to looking thru an eyepiece.
Any suggestions or ideas? Thank you.
Ray

#2 Mark Sibole

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 07:05 AM

Ray
As Jupiter is very bright you will want to use a very short exposure.
Try the auto exposure setting and let it run.
Then back off on the time.
It may only be like .oo25 seconds or even less.
Focus is also critical.




Mark
Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com

#3 flyingairedale

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Posted 31 October 2007 - 05:06 PM

I'm new to imaging and am having similar challenges with Jupiter and Saturn (see attached).  I've tried manual and auto contrast, a neutral density filter, and shortening the exposure to the lowest values possible.  I've played with nearly everything but with little change in results.

When I try to image stars, nothing is a appearing at any exposure, just a gray background.

However, I'm having no problems imaging the moon!

I'm using the original DSI with a consumer quality 90mm Maksutov-Cassegrain in a high light pollution area (inside Atlanta).

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks.

[attachment deleted by admin]

#4 firemouth

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 08:16 AM

Not knowing anything about stacking yet, I do know that light pollution will adversely affect any pic, telescope or not.

Here is your pic after controlling light levels with PS...
Posted Image

You can see there are stars visible. They are just clouded by the associated light.

I know how to correct photos with the camera but am also confused in telescopes.
I have a USB purt on my camera, but am clueless how to use it with a telescope and have the Meade camera that came with mine.

Have you ever took a drive away from Atlanta and tried using the scope in a darker, higher location?
20x50mm Binocs
Meade LS-8 ACF
Celestron SkyScout

#5 Mark Sibole

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 08:18 AM

Exposure time is to long.
For imaging planets your exposures will be well less than a seconf.
More around .004 seconds.
Keep lowering the exposure and make minor adjustments to the histogram.
When you hit the right exposure the details will pop out.

Regards

Mark
Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com




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