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ETX-60 Focuser Knob Removal?


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#1 Kruegon

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 09:25 AM

I recently acquired an ETX-60AT-BB for my wife. First, just know that I got it dirt cheap. Otherwise, this would all seem for nothing.

The scope was in poor shape when I got it. The buolt-in barlow would hardly move. The objective lens was coated in dust. The battery pack was missing and had a 9v in its place. And best of all, the flip mirror was rattling around inside the scope. After some rather extensive disassembly and work, its back up to par... for the most part.

During disassembly, I was able to remove the objective and focuser rod. This allowed me to tilt the focuser knob enough to remove the tube screw behind it. Now I am ready to insert the objective assembly, but I'm having issues getting everything to line up with the focuser knob still inset.

Does anyone know how to properly remove the knob? This is the last step before it's completely ready for use. I was seriously hoping to test it's go to tonight.

Thanks for any help.

#2 MistrBadgr

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 12:50 PM

Hello and welcome to the forum! :)

 

You might want to check out the "Mike Weasner's Mighty ETX" site.  It is not an active site, but there are a lot of articles in it that have been useful to people on various technical issues.  I cannot do it before this evening, but if all else fails, I can see if I can look inside an ETX 80 I have in the closet.  Just google Mike Weasner's site andit will come up in the list.

 

Please let me know how things are going and if I need to take apart the ETX 80 and see if I can figure something out.

 

If anyone else knows or has an idea, please speak up!  I have not had an ETX refractor apart before and this is new territory.

 

Also, if your wife or you feel inclined, post about your adventures with it.  Things like that can inspire others.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 Kruegon

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 02:06 PM

Thanks for the response!

I should have mentioned that I have already been over his site. The focuser knob on the ETX-60 is noticeably different than on the ETX-70 and above. Those, the focuser knob is a straight through design. The ETX-60 is a 90° with spider gears.

#4 MistrBadgr

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 02:16 PM

Being different than the 80 does pose problems.  Maybe someone else will post.


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#5 MistrBadgr

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 10:16 PM

Have you had any luck finding anything out?

 

A couple of other places:  Cloudy Nights Forum and International Astronomy Forum.


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#6 Kruegon

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 10:35 PM

No luck so far. Posted over at Cloudy Nights first. Not one response. Wasn't familiar with the other. I'll have to check it out. Thanks for the info.

#7 MistrBadgr

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 08:51 AM

A comment on another issue in your original post:

 

Originally, I am thinking AA batteries were 1.5 volts and they count on that when putting batteries in.  However, AA batteries are now stated to be 1.25 volts.  The little holder for batteries in the ETX only hold six batteries, which may cause the scope to move sluggishly.  That may be a reason for the switch to a 9V battery, or they may have left batteries in the scope and they corroded the holder.

 

Two approaches that I can think of, if you do not want to use the 9 volt batteries: 

 

Bill Vorce at telescope-warehouse, (on eBay, Amazon, and on line) is the most likely source for the battery holder for your scope.  You could also try Meade customer support.  The holder may still be the same as with yours.  The phone number is 1-800-626-3233, in the USA only. 

 

The other option is to get a 9 volt power supply and plug it into a house power outlet.  Power requirements are actually pretty low and the power supply for many other devices that are 9 volts can work.  I have done this a lot with DS scopes and it has worked for me with any power supply with at least a 350 mA rating.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#8 Kruegon

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 06:43 PM

I actually ordered the 6AA battery pack from Bill already. He is my first stop for anything old Meade. I have two DS-114AT scopes, a DS-114EQ, the ETX-60, an NG-60AZ, an NGC-70TC, a Terrastar 60, and an Infinity 50. He and I are practically on a first name basis. There's also four Orions and two Celestrons.

#9 MistrBadgr

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 07:36 PM

Man!  That is great!  I had a TerraStar 60 that I purchased as a flood victim and rebuilt, an NG 60, have gone through a number of NG 70's....fix them up, use them for a while, then end up giving them to someone who needs a scope.  I currently have one of the really old Meade 60mm by 900mm optical tubes on an NG 60 mount, this Infinity 60, an Infinity 80 (did the Messier list from my suburban back yard), Infinity 102, Polaris 130, EclipseView 114.  I have had a number of DS 2000 scopes.

 

I have the ETX 80 mostly to get out and help people through troubles.  It is a nice scope, but I personally prefer manual ones any more.  I need to exercise the computer my head, rather than one in a machine. :)

 

Hope you get your ETX 60 fixed up and going!


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#10 Kruegon

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 06:19 PM

The ETX-60 is back together. I never did get my focuser knob out, but I'll work that next time I clean and grease it. I'm getting a motor unit failure using the Autostar. I'm still thinking it's a problem in using a 9v battery vs the 6AA battery pack. I'll know more when the new battery pack arrived.

Has anyone ever built a 12v converter lead for one? I found a 12v in to 9v out inline converter on eBay. I'm thinking of using it with an SLA7-12 rechargeable battery. This is the same battery found in many smaller battery back ups for computers. Most of my viewing sites don't have power for the 110v versions that are available. What are your collective thoughts?

https://rover.ebay.c...tm/302575642848

#11 MistrBadgr

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 07:41 PM

On some of my DS mounts, I took a nine volt battery connector and soldered it to a more conventional plug used on power supplies.  I do not remember the letter for it.  That fitting was a bulkhead that I mounted in the battery cover.  I would then hook up a power supply and on via extension cord to the house power.  You could do the same with a big battery....just  need some long leads.  For the DS mounts, the motors are capable of handling 12 volts, but I have no idea about an ETX.  Probably need to stick to nine volts with it, since it uses six AA Batteries and not eight, like the DS mount does.

 

The price looks good on that converter!

 

Glad to here that you got the scope back together! :)


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#12 Kruegon

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 08:43 PM

We have the older DS scopes. They're 15v not 12v. They require 10 AAs. I'm looking at a voltage step up converter for them. The best I have found used a set screw for the variable output voltage. Not sure I like that idea.

#13 MistrBadgr

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 04:57 AM

You would definitely want to check the output with a volt meter and make sure you are not going over 15 volts. 

 

Putting yours on 12 volts for a test might be worth a try.  If they seem sluggish, then it is probably not enough.  Since batteries go down in voltage with usage, the lower voltage that is constant, I am thinking, should still fall in the usable range and not hurt the scope.  With ten new batteries that are now rated at 1.25 volts each, you are running at 12.5 volts and not 15 anyway.


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#14 Kruegon

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 02:07 PM

The alkaline batteries I get say and read 1.5v on my meter. The nimh say and test at 1.2v. So it seems to depend on the battery. My beluuef is that the larger 12v battery with the 15v converter will maintain a more stable throughout than the 10AAs will. If it fails, I can always get a 24v and step down to 15v. Just like I'll be stepping the 12v down to 9v.

I wish I had specs on the system. It would be nice to know what the upper limit on the voltage is. Could the 9v system handle 12v? Could the 15v system handle 24v? How much are they playing it safe?




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