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Rosette Nebula


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#1 SBacon

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 09:18 AM

Shot this last night before the big 'ol moon came up.

 

Meade 8" LX90

Meade wedge

Meade 6.3 focal reducer

Meade #62 T adaptor

Canon Rebel T5 DSLR

ISO 3200

60 second exposures

41 images stacked in Deep Sky Stacker

Images enhanced in Photoshop and Digital Photo Professional

 

Steve

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  • Rosette ISO 3200 41 x 60s 2 DPP PS 2.jpg

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#2 MistrBadgr

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 06:46 PM

That is about what I see from my back yard, minus the dimmer stars and the color.  Looks like you have the tracking down very well! :)

 

Bill


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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 SBacon

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 06:49 AM

I need to dedicate more time to to the target but right now I am having to shoot with the camera battery because the ac adapter went out.  Got another one ordered.  Like Mark said, "It never ends!"

 

Steve


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#4 E Sully

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:16 PM

Steve,  I have not done any photography with my digital camera yet, but have been researching it a bit.

I noticed you have been using ISO 3200.  From my reading it seems the best recommended setting for your camera should be 800.

http://dslr-astropho...-canon-cameras/



#5 SBacon

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Posted Yesterday, 06:40 PM

Hi Mr. Sully,

 

Thanks for that link. It is a very interesting article. That guy has taken some beautiful shots and really favors the Nikon cameras. What I have found is that the longer you are able to track and expose the light to your sensor the lower you can go with the ISO and less noise your picture will have.  Shooting deep space objects at 60 or 90 seconds like I am doing requires the higher ISO's to even begin to see any details in the them.

 

This has stirred my curiosity though to prove or disprove my point.  I have been wanting to gather more data on M1 so the next clear night I will shoot for 1 hour at 800 and 1 hour at 1600 ISO and compare those stacked shots with my previous shot at 3200. ( I started setting up tonight but clouds began to roll in from Spiral's neck of the woods! (Tennessee)) :)

 

Steve






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