Jump to content


Photo

Messier Hunt with an Infinity 80, Targets 71 through 110


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 09 December 2016 - 05:34 PM

I am going to try and put the last third of the Targets in this one string of posts.  I have no idea if they will come in large batches or if they will come just a couple at a time, like this morning.  Anyway, here goes:

 

December 9, 2016-Morning

 

The alarm went off at 5 AM and I was up like a shot.  Fifteen minutes later, I was outside, dressed properly (feet down the right pant legs, etc.) and encumbered with the correct clothing for 13 Deg F weather, telescope in place, and eyes trying to focus!  After some preliminary efforts at Jupiter, I decided I was prepared enough to try for M65 and M66

71-M66 and 72-M65:  The Leo Triplet of galaxies are located about half way along a line from Theta to Iota Leonis.  Theta is in the position of the lower edge of the body of the lion and about where the bottom of the hip would be.  Iota is located southeast of Theta about five degrees in the position of the rear knee.  M65 is directly on the line in my atlas with M66 just to the east of it.  NGC 3628, the third galaxy is North of M66.  All three can be enclosed by a one degree circle.

 

Just to the west of the trio is a curved arrangement of stars that reminds me of a question mark.  The brightest star of that curving group is 73 Leonis, which shows in my regular atlas with its number.  There is roughly a tenth magnitude star to the east of 73 that forms the top left end of the question mark.  That star is almost between M65 and NGC 3628.

With my scope centered on where I thought the middle of the trio should be, at 16X, about a degree east of 73 Leonis, I waited for a while and could see a vague vertical spot of lighter grey, which I guessed was M66.  I switched eyepieces to 32X and waited.  The first spot was definitely there.  In a minute or so, a second vertical swatch of grey showed up.  The tenth magnitude star was above that swatch, so that much be M65.  Looking slightly above the star and a little to the left, I could see a vague lightening in the background that seems circular or nearly so to me.  This was in the spot where NGC 3628 is indicated in my atlas.

 

After that, I attempted to move on to a whole cluster of galaxies east of Beta Leonis, the lion’s tail star.  However, I started having trouble seeing things.  Both contrast was decreasing as well as the brightness of stars.  I looked to see if my objective was frosting up, but did not see anything.  Possibly, a thin cloud had moved in the way.  At that point, I noticed that my toes were getting past cold and were getting a bit numb, so I decided to call the session to an end.  I was out about 45 minutes all together, a little shorter than I would have liked, but successful for this quest, none the less.

 

Session Summary:

71-M66:  Located between Theta and Iota Leonis. Appeared and a vertically elongated grey patch east of 73 Leonis and just east of M65.  Spotted at 16x, best view at 32X. 12/9/2016 05:40 AM CST

 

72-M65:  Located between Theta and Iota Leonis. Appeared and a vertically elongated grey patch east of 73 Leonis and just west of M66.  Spotted and viewed at 32X. 12/9/2016 05:45AM CST


  • mariosi, RickScofield, spiral and 1 other like this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#2 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 29 December 2016 - 06:41 PM

December 29, 2016 – Morning

 

I woke up before 5 AM and was outside, setting my astronomy chair in place when my phone alarm went off.  I am not sure how that happened, but I am glad it did.  The sky was great and the temperature was around 33 deg F.  By 5:05, I was warming up with Jupiter.  I managed to pick out part of the Northern Temperate Belt as well as mottling in the two equatorial belts.  For the Infinity 80 and my artificial eye lenses, that is doing pretty good!  I had made a 70mm orifice mask to try out on Jupiter and had it hanging on the azimuth control knob’s cable, but forgot to try it.  That, or an 82A filter might help some more.

 
With that done, I thought it was time to start on Messier Objects.  Since it had been 20 days from my last Messier session, I was not sure if I would have much success, if any, or if this would simply be a warm-up session to get me ready for the next time.

 

73-M98:  This one is located about six degrees east of Beta Leonis, or Denebola.  I went for my longest focal length Plossl, which gives me over 3.5 degrees of true field, and centered my red dot finder on Denebola.  This star is just about at zenith at this time of the morning now, and was readily apparent.  This area is, fortunately, far enough North that it missing a rather high light pollution area to my South, so the conditions were pretty good.  Moving the scope eastward, I was able to locate 6 Coma Berenices.  This is the right end star of several that form what looks like a Tee that was in an accident and bent the bottom line a little.  M98 is supposed to be straight west of that star about a degree.

 

At that point, I started moving down the line of eyepieces, trying to find the one that would work the best for me, but thinking it would end up being my 5000 series 5 element 9mm Plossl, but was surprised to find that a 12.5mm four element Possl did better this time.  What I found that worked best for me this session was to use a 25mm eyepiece to locate the right stars near a galaxy, then switch to the 12.5 and wait for the object to show up.

 

This ended up being the case for M98.  Just a little wait, I could see a definite grey patch, which is what I saw with all of these objects.  I did not see anything definite, like a brighter center or anything like that, just a general lightening of the field in the area where my finder chart said they should be, based on the surrounding stars.  I was using one chart from the Uranometria, that I had scanned and circled the Messier objects on it.

 

74-M99:  From M98, I moved over to the middle star in the bent stem of the tee.  Sure enough, there was a brightening of the background just to the right of that star.  Again, there were no details to be seen, just a general area that was a little brighter grey than the background around it.  With this one, I did not put the longer focal length lens in the telescope, I just stayed with the 12.5 mm Plossl.

 

75-M100:  Next, I moved back up to the top “bar” of the tee and moved to the left end (eastern) and kept going along that line for another half degree or so.  Again, there was a grey area that was lighter than the background where M100 was supposed to be.  I studied it for a little bit to see if any details would show up, but they did not.

 

76-M88:  At this point, I put the 25mm eyepiece back in the scope and compared what I saw with my finder chart.  At that point, there was another object just above M100 that I should have gone for, but it was off this particular chart and I will have to go back to it.  Instead, I decided to make a counter-clockwise sweep in the area and head toward the southeast.  On the finder chart, M88 is roughly three degrees SE of M100, about a half degree from what looked to be a seventh magnitude star on the chart.  Sure enough, I found the star and the spot M88 was supposed to be.  Switching back to the 12.5mm eyepiece, I made out the grey area, exactly where it was supposed to be.

 

77-M91:  This galaxy is supposed to be about a degree and a quarter to the east of M88.  Using just the 12.5mm eyepiece, I moved the scope east and a grey spot came into view.  I looked back and forth between M88 and M91 to verify a line of three Mag 9 stars running just above the galaxies and found them for verification that I was looking at the correct objects.  The star pattern matched the chart.

 

78-M87:  After M91, and looking at my chart, I put the 25mm eyepiece back in the scope and centered on M88.  I then dropped Southward about two degrees to a Mag 7 star.  This star is on the left end of a somewhat curved line of four Mag 7 stars.  When I looked at the pattern, what stood out to me was a couple pair of equally matched stars that were lined up vertically, and the line of four stars was not quite as noticeable, even though I could see the line well.  M87 showed on my chart to be about a half degree to the NW or that first star that is the east end of the four making up the curved line.  I switched to the 12.5 mm eyepiece and waited a little while.  M87 became apparent, again, as a dim grey area.

 

79-M89 is located to the east of M87 about a degree and a half, between two Mag 9 stars, with a third one to the North, making a triangle.  M87 is basically on the southern line of that triangle.  I just moved the scope to the area, with the 12.5 mm eyepiece in place and saw M89’s grey patch.

 

From that point, I decided to head to the general area of M84 and M85, which are about two degrees NW of M87.  I actually made the move to the area, consulting my chart and looking in the scope with the 25mm eyepiece.  I moved to the 12.5 eyepiece and was trying to verify small stars when the batteries in my red flashlight went out.

 

At that point, I had found seven objects, was going to have to go back into the house to get more batteries, and realized I was fairly tired and cold.  That is good enough for one session!

 

Reviewing charts when I came inside, I realized there were several more in the area, enough to catch another six or seven another time.  By the way, when I came inside and looked at the clock, it showed 6:30.

 

Session Summary:

 

73-M98:  Located about 6 deg east of Beta Leonis, the tail star in the Lion, and maybe a degree west of 6 Coma Berenices.  Saw dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 05:30AM CST

 

74-M99:  Located about a degree SE of 6 Coma Berenices, near M98.  Saw dim grey area at 32X.   12/29/2016 05:35AM CST

 

75-M100:  Located about two degrees NE of 6 Coma Berenices, near M98 and 99.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 05:40AM CST

 

76-M88:  Located about 3 degrees SE of M100.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 05:50AM CST

 

77-M91:  Located about a degree east of M88. Saw a dim grey area at 32X. 12/29/2016 05:55AM CST

 

78-M87:  Located about two degrees South of M88 and a touch west.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 06:05AM CST

 

79-M89:  Located maybe a degree and a quarter east of M87.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X. 12/29/2016 06:10AM CST


  • mariosi and SBacon like this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 SBacon

SBacon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 155 posts
  • LocationKillen, Alabama, USA

Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:12 AM

Wow!  That's a lot of viewing for an hour and a half!

 

Really enjoying your posts.

 

Steve



#4 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:18 PM

Thanks, Steve!  I enjoy writing them!  The only part that is not enjoyable sometimes is getting my body to cooperate that early  in the morning!!!

 

Bill


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#5 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 31 December 2016 - 08:43 PM

December 31, 2016 – Morning

 

I managed to make it outside around 5:30 AM.  I was not sure what the sky would be like.  The forecast I had was a saying partly cloudy during the day, but I did not know when that would start.  I found the sky more turbulent than it had been the last session and very thin clouds were moving in from the northwest and had already taken over the area I have been finding galaxies on the 29th.

After I set everything up in a hurry, I remembered there were some objects in the area of Corvus, but I could not remember exactly what.  Going to my Pocket Sky Atlas, I found that there was a globular cluster, M68, and a spiral galaxy, M104 or the Sombrero Galaxy, in the area.

 

80-M68:  This globular cluster is located maybe four degrees SSE of Beta Corvi, the southeastern of the four major stars in the figure.  I had my 30 mm Plossl in the eyepiece holder of the Infinity 80 refractor and put the red dot of the finder on Beta Corvi, which was quite apparent directly South and uncomfortably close to house tops.

 

From that position, I moved the scope in a SSE direction until an unlabeled fifth magnitude star came into view.  The star has an A number associated with it, so it is a double or multiple star, but I was not paying attention to that at the time.  M68 is located NE of that star less than a degree.  I switched to a 12.5mm eyepiece and was able to make out a grey fuzzy circular area in the right location.  I observed the area for a few minutes, hoping to see some differences in the grey toward the center, but could not.

 

81-M104:  This is the Sombrero Galaxy.  It is located roughly five degrees NE of Delta Corvi, the northeastern major star in the figure.  Eta if very close, ENE, of Delta and is quite apparent.  There is somewhat of a path of dimmer stars heading off to the NE, which I followed.  The last few show to be double stars in the atlas, which turned out to look more like small clusters of stars.  The very last double star, that is next to M104 on its right, turned out to be four stars with three of them in a row, and the forth one was down and to the right of the end star of the three.  This end star of the three appeared to be the primary of the group.  I am not sure if all four stars are part of a multiple star system, but it looked quite nice and kept distracting me as I was observing the Sombrero.

 

I kept looking at the grey spot and it seemed to have something different about it.  Sometimes there seemed to be a flat bottom to the grey area with a little of the grey below somehow, then the bottom  would go away on me.  When this happened the orientation of the galaxy seemed to change. 

 

After a while, I looked up and saw that the clouds were about to overtake the one area I had to observe, so I decided to call it quits.  The rest of the objects I had researched and had finder charts for were involved with thin clouds.  I could see some stars through the clouds, but knew I would not be able to see the objects I was after.

 

Session Summary:

 

80-M68:  Globular Cluster approximately 4 deg SSE of Beta Corvii.  Saw relatively large round grey patch at 32X. 12/31/2016 05:35 AM CST

 

81-M104:  Sombrero Galaxy approximately 5 deg NNE of Delta Corvii.  Saw dim grey, somewhat elongated patch at 32X 12/31/2016 05:45 AM CST

 

Bill Steen


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#6 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 01 January 2017 - 06:38 AM

January 1, 2017 – Morning

 

I made it outside a little before 5 AM to find the sky mostly covered with thin clouds in the area I have been working.  The only open area was to the southeast.  With the speed the clouds were moving toward the southeast, I did not think I had much chance of finding any new Messier objects.  However, there was one in that area, very low and just barely above house tops that might be workable.  I managed to get everything set up get my red dot finder on Spica as my starting point.

 

Before I could get going, the clouds hit the area.  Looking around, I could see an end to the patch in the northwest.  Since everything seemed to be moving pretty fast, I decided to just sit there and wait it out.  I had a nice time just looking around and listening to some coyotes howling in the distance.  Some dogs were barking in the direction the coyotes were howling, so it might have been in response.  Eventually, the clouds cleared and I could start.

 

82-M83:  The Seashell Galaxy is located about 18 degrees South of Spica.  The closest visible star from my back yard is Gamma Hydra.  This star is located about eleven degrees South of Spica and is just above a line coming from Epsilon through Beta Corvus.  From Gamma, the trail is difficult for me to describe.  There is a very ragged smattering trail of stars leading SSE from Gamma to M83, which is about eight degrees away.  I simply had to memorize the pattern and verify it back and forth from eyepiece to atlas.  I finally made my way there and started using my finder chart from Uranometria 2000.  I could see a vertical arch of three stars to the west of where M83 is supposed to be and another one slightly to the east of that spot.  These were all in the Mag 6 range. 

 

Switching eyepieces from 30mm to 12.5, I centered the field on the spot where the galaxy is supposed to be and simply waited.  Shortly, an image started to form as my eye and visual memory saturated.  It was just barely apparent, but was there.

 

With this object being so low in my sky, I do not think I would ever be able to see any detail from it with a small scope, even if I went to a dark location.  I would need to travel South a few degrees from my 36 degrees N latitude or use a larger scope.

 

After studying the grey spot for a while, trying to see any real shape or detail, I looked at my watch and saw that it was nearly 6 AM and time to go in.  My time flies when you are having fun!

 

Session Summary:

 

82-M83:  Seashell Galaxy approximately 8 deg SE of Gamma Hydra.  Very faint grey area at 32X.  No details to be seen 1/1/2017 05:45 AM CST

 

Bill Steen


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#7 Philip Pugh

Philip Pugh

    Sir Philip Pugh, AKA Astrochav

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 920 posts
  • LocationBased in South West England and Wales

Posted 01 January 2017 - 12:13 PM

I find the Leo triplet needs good conditions. If I can't get M65 and M66, I know I can forget about the Virgo Supercluster.



#8 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 01 January 2017 - 05:07 PM

I have not thought about it that way, but you are definitely right!  M65 and M66 had more definition to them than what I am finding in Virgo. :)


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#9 Philip Pugh

Philip Pugh

    Sir Philip Pugh, AKA Astrochav

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 920 posts
  • LocationBased in South West England and Wales

Posted 02 January 2017 - 01:50 PM

It's more noticeable from the UK but the Virgo cluster galaxies are further down in the murk!

 

I bagged M79 from Chicago with 15x70 bins but cannot from the UK.



#10 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 07 January 2017 - 07:14 AM

January 7, 2017 – Morning

 

The alarm clock went off at 4 AM.  (enough said.)  After getting properly dressed for 7 deg F, I made it outside with clipboard of finder charts and Sky and Telescope’s Pocket Sky Atlas.  I put out the Infinity 80, astronomy chair, and a plastic lawn chair I use to set things on.  Looking up, the handle of the Big Dipper was calling me somehow.  I had intended to go back to the cluster of galaxies east of Leonis, but I changed my mind on a whim.

 

83-M101:  I found the right finder chart and looked at my note on it that said M101 was on Atlas page 42.  Finding it on that page of the atlas, I saw that it is located near the club of Bootes and the star Kappa Bootes, in particular.  I did manage visually locate Theta Bootes and finally got a wink from Kappa.  Placing my red dot finder on the spot I thought the wink came from and looking in the 30mm eyepiece I had in place, I could definitely see it.  Pulling the scope around a bit, I verified Theta, Kappa, and Lambda Bootes near Kappa.  Using the line formed by Lambda and Kappa Bootes as my guide, I started out in the direction of M101, attempting to verify my way with dimmer star patterns.  I always have trouble in new areas, especially those more toward the North.  I had to go back to Kappa and start over several times, but eventually made my way to the area where M101 is located, verifying the dim stars near it on my finder chart.

 

Once in the right area, I switched to a 20mm Plossl, focused, and waited.  Sure enough, a grey area began to form.  At that magnification, the dim grey area seemed fairly round with some mottling in it, and sometimes seemed to have a slightly brighter spot in the middle.  I tried several different magnifications, but 2X seemed to give me more clarity, which is different than I have experienced in the past.  This amounted to a 4mm pupil size instead of something around 2mm or less that I normally need to find galaxies.

 

84-M102:  Since I was in the general area of 102, I decided to try for it.  Rather than moving to a major star and working toward the object, I decided to try and follow the stars shown on my atlas and see if I could work my way across to M102.  It took me a while to match and verify stars.  In fact, I moved past it until I found a string of star pairs in the mag 5 or 6 range that I could identify with certainty.  From there, I worked my way backwards to a triangle of stars that gave me a good reference.  The M102 that I was targeting is NGC 5866.  There are supposed to be two other galaxies in the immediate vicinity of M102, and I believe I located one of those (NGC 5879) and might have seen evidence of (NGC 5907).  5907 was very, very dim and what I saw may have been more my wishful thinking that the galaxy in truth.  The other two were definitely visible, though dim.

 

85-M51:  After M102, I decided to stay in the area and go on the other side of the Big Dipper’s handle.  M51 is not far from the end star of the handle, Eta Ursa Majoris.  I found that star and put my red dot on it and changed to the 30mm Plossl.  I could see Eta and 24 Ursa Majoris, about 2 ½ degrees to the east of Eta.  M51 is another 2 ½ deg to the SSE of 24, forming a rather balanced triangle between Eta, 24, and M51 with the Eta to M51 leg being longer than the other two.  I confirmed three probably mag 7 stars that almost form an equilateral triangle that almost touches M51 on my charts.  Switching to the 20mm eyepiece, I waited.  Sure enough, a grey area showed up, but it was surprisingly dimmer than either M101 or M102!  Eventually, I could make out that it was not round, but more elongated toward the North, sort of pear shaped.  This is what I was waiting for.

 

I started looking at my charts for the next object and decided on M63, the Sunflower Galaxy, and looked at the spot in the sky where it should be.  By this time, the spot was nearly overhead.  By this time, it was approaching 6 AM and I had been out in the 7 degree weather for an hour and a half, just sitting.  My toes were starting to tingle in a way that I do not like.  I wanted to stay out, but decided not to play with the cold and end up doing something stupid.  Three rather difficult objects on a cold morning like this is a success in my universe, so I headed in.

 

Session Summary:

 

83-M101: SG located approximately 3 deg NNE of Kappa Bootes (end of Bootes' club).  Saw large round dim grey area,  brightening a little in middle, at 20X. 1/7/2017 05:10 AM CST

84-M102: SG (NGC 5866) located approx 4 deg SSE of Lambda Draconis and eight deg west of M101.  Oval grey area maybe a little brighter in middle at 20X. 1/7/2017 05:25 AM CST

85-M51  Whirlpool Galaxy located approx 4 deg SE of Eta Ursa Major (tip of Big Dipper’s handle)  Saw slightly elongated grey area at 20X. 1/7/2017 05:45 AM CST 


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#11 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 09 January 2017 - 09:01 AM

January 9.2017 – Morning

 

I woke up before the 4 AM alarm went off, rummaged around for a little while waking up and getting all suited up for the cold.  The outside thermometer, which I can read inside the house showed 23 deg F.  By 4:15 I was outside and set up with the Infinity 80, astronomy chair, plastic chair I use for a table, a bunch of eyepieces, Sky and Telescope’s Pocket Sky Atlas, red flashlight, and finder charts.  The Clear Sky Chart on the astrotulsa.com website showed no clouds, medocre seeing and transparency, and a two hour window between the moon going down and the sun coming up from about 4AM to 6AM.

 

Since the Sunflower Galaxy (M63) and M94 had proven to be nearly overhead at the end of my session the last time, I decided to go for them first.  Looking at page 43 in the atlas I could see they were both North and east of Alpha and Beta Canes Venatici. (Cor Caroli and Chara)

 

86-M63:  The Sunflower Galaxy is located about five degrees NE of Cor Caroli.  Looking up, I could see that star easily.  With a little patience, I could make out Chara.  I put the red dot of my finder, with a little body twisting, on the spot I thought M63 should be, based on the positions of the two stars.  I missed just a little bit, when I looked through the 30mm Plossl, but I was not far off.  I identified a trio of nearby stars.  Though there is a little conflict in labeling between my atlas and finder charts from Uranometria, I believe they are 18, 19, and 20 CV.  M 63 shows to be a little over a degree North of 19 CV, which proved to be correct.  With a little movement of the scope, the galaxy was apparent as a grey elongated oval at 13X.  Switching to the 20mm, I could see a larger area with some indication of the center  portion being brighter.

 

87-M94:  From M63, I tried at first to move to M94 directly, using my star maps as a guide and identifying various stars along the way.  I made it about a third of the way and identified a group of four readily identifiable stars, but became stuck there.  There is a significantly large gap with no stars from that point to where M94 is supposed to be located, so I changed tactics.

 

I put my red dot finder on Chara, Beta CV, and saw it in the eyepiece.  From there I moved to 9 CV and on to another dimmer star in a line with Beta and 9.  From there, I headed toward Cor Caroli, Alpha DV,  and noticed another reasonably bright star off the line from Beta to Alpha.  Looking at my charts and moving the scope around a bit, I decided that reasonably bright star was 10 CV.  The charts showed me that M94 should be on the other side of the Alpha Beta line from 10 CV and about twice as far off the line.  I headed in that direction, but missed the galaxy.  I found a string of stars just past the galaxy that I could identify, especially a group of four making a lopsided diamond in the string, that had one double star.  M94 should be on a line from the double star through the star across the diamond and on about a degree.  In about that location, there were three 8 and 9 Mag stars forming a triangle with a relatively bright “nugget” in the midst of the stars and on a line between two of them, closest to the dimmest of the three. 

 

By that time, I had switched to the 20mm eyepiece from the 30, so the discovery is listed as being at 20X.  However, I believe it would be visible at 13X if I had understood what the size of the galaxy would be.  I thought at the time that this galaxy must have a bright center with the rest being very dim and would have to look up pictures of it when I went inside.  Later, after the session, the image brought up by the AutoStar program showed a bright core with a rather small, almost circular disk around it.

 

From M94, I tried to go back where I had left off just east of Leo to find the last two galaxies in that area.  I started with Beta Leo, but had a hard time finding 6 Coma Berenices for some reason.  I finally found it and started working my way toward M84 and M86, following lesser stars.  The stars seemed to get harder to see as I went along.  When I reached the place where M84 should be, I could not see any sign of it.  Scanned around referring to my charts to make sure I was in the right spot, and I believe I was. 

 

About then, the stars seemed to dim some more and I looked up.  A wavy blanket of very thin clouds was moving over and had been for a while.  Looking back over my shoulder, I could not see any opening in the blanket that would be in position before the sun came up.  Time to pack up and go in.  Well, I had not known what to expect that morning, due to what the Clear Sky Chart had shown and did not expect to have much success.  Instead, I found two Messier Objects.  It was a good session!

 

Session Summary:

 

86-M63:  SG located approximately 5 deg  NW of Alpha Canes Venatici.  Elongated grey patch apparent at 13X but best seen at 20X 1/9/2017 04:40 AM CST

 

87-M94:  Small readily apparent grey "nugget" about 40% of the way between Alpha and Beta Canes Venatici and 1 1/2 deg to the left of that line.  Best at 20X 1/9/2017 05:15 AM CST


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#12 Philip Pugh

Philip Pugh

    Sir Philip Pugh, AKA Astrochav

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 920 posts
  • LocationBased in South West England and Wales

Posted 03 February 2017 - 01:21 PM

Do you have a dark site? I bagged the Messier objects from suburbia but used a 127 Mak and not an 80mm 'scope. Most nights I could get down to Mag 9 but anything fainter needed a really clear night, so that's why it took me four years!

 

What really helped me was a 9x50 RA finderscope, which even showed M33 from a dark site and a focal reducer, giving an effective focal length eyepiece of 64mm.

 

Due to persistent manful and bad weather, I am more on the photographic side these days. I've thought about trying to snap the Messier objects but doubt whether I can get them all without a motor-driven mount.



#13 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 06 February 2017 - 08:14 AM

Hi Phillip,

 

I am trying to get as many as I can from my suburban back yard as an experiment.  For some, it definitely is taking a clear night.  On a very good series of three nights a few years ago, I was able to identify the super nova in M-82 with a 60mm f/11 refractor when the SN was at mag 10 from the same location.....just barely.  This location shows to be a dark red zone on the most recent dark sky map.

 

I have one more object that I have not reported about yet, M106.  I did it just before getting sick with a virus.  As my head becomes less fuzzy, I will write something about it, but am waiting some more for my lungs to clear up before venturing out in the cold again.  Hopefully, that will happen soon.

 

Bill


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#14 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 04 April 2017 - 04:09 PM

January 23, 2017 – Morning

Got up early with mixed thoughts on being able to see anything.  The weather reports were not promising.  Looking outside, the sky was covered with thin clouds from overhead to the southern horizon.  I would not be able to view in the area I had wanted to look for the remaining galaxies I needed in Virgo.  The sky was, however, open to the North.

88-M106 This galaxy is located in Canes Venatici, near its northern border, but I associate it more with Ursa Majoris.  I started out at Gamma Ursa Major, the bottom of the big dipper’s pan, under the handle.  From there, I went downward, as down under the bottom of the dipper pan bottom, to the next bright star, Chi Ursa Majoris.  This star is about six degrees away from Gamma and, at that time of the morning, to the east to my eyes.  I could just barely make it out.  Using my finder chart, I worked my way to the west of Chi (really downward), following the star pattern, about five degrees, to M106.

M106 was quite obvious, compared to the galaxies I have recently located.  It was a rather large grey elongated oval, with its long axis running from about the eleven o’clock position to five o’clock in my field, using a correct image diagonal, at 13X.  Changing to a 20mm eyepiece, the object was even better.  I tried higher magnification, but 20X seemed to be about the best.  As with this run on the Messier Objects, I am using an Infinity 80, f/5 refractor.

After viewing M106 for a bit, the galaxy started to fade.  Looking at the sky, the clear part was fogging over, so I packed up my equipment and went in.

Session Summary:

88-M106 Elongated grey oval showing almost vertical in eyepiece.  Visible at 13X but optimum at 20X. 1/23/2017 04:50 AM CST

March 31, 2017 – Evening

When I went in from my last morning out, little did I know it would  be over two months until I would be in a position to go after more new Messier Objects.  Therefore, I was quite happy to make an attempt when the weather forecast proved to be partially wrong.  By this time, my targets had moved enough to allow me to make an attempt in the late evening, rather than in the early morning.

In terms of seeing, I would rate it as 4 of 5, but transparency would be marginal.  I rated it at 2.5.  I did not know if I would find anything, but thought it was worth the try.  After getting set up with the Infinity 80, and reviewing my charts, I decided to try for the remaining four galaxies that I needed in Virgo.

89-M85:  Using Beta Leonis, the bright tail star of the lion, which was approaching zenith as a starting point, I figured out my orientation, using the smaller stars around Beta.  Using my Pocket Sky Atlas and my finder chart, I was able to identify enough dim star patterns to work my way the eight degrees to the WNW of Beta to M85.

This galaxy showed up much as I expected it to, as a rather large round patch of grey.  It was not bright by any means, but was discernable with my finder eyepiece at 13X, but was much better at 20X.  With no real detail visible, I really could not see any improvement at higher magnification.  My watch showed 10:45 PM CDT.

90 and 91- M84 and 86:  For these, I went back to Beta Leonis for a starting point and headed in a different direction, a little more southerly.  Having a true field of view at nearly 4 degrees was an asset for this search, since there were not very many bright stars to the east of Beta for a space.  I was, however, able to keep going and find some star patterns that I could identify.  I went back and forth some, to verify I was on the right track.  Eventually, I ended up with a star pattern that matched the charts and both galaxies should be in the field.  At 13X, I did not see anything.  I tried different magnifications and finally settled on 20X, which had been working for me lately. 

 

Eventually, I began to get “whiffs” of something in one spot and then another, but not at the same time.  After a while, it dawned on me to use averted vision, and I started seeing more.  Finally, I did get some winks when both galaxies were visible at the same time.  M84 appeared to be smaller and a bit more elongated while M84 showed to be a tiny bit brighter to me and was round.  Charts show M84 to be pretty round also, but that is not quite what I saw.  I re-verified the star pattern in the area and I was looking at the right spot.
Looking at my watch, the time was 11:15 CDT.  These objects were really tough, compared to M85.  A lot more than I had expected.  However, I did find them.  Thinking back on the situation, I think the sky was deteriorating.

The next object I needed was M49 in the southern half of the galaxies in Virgo.  I made several attempts to follow star patterns but got lost each time.  Looking at the sky, it was fogging over, so I packed things up and went in.

Session Summary:

89-M85 Relatively large grey spot visible at 13X, but was better at 20X 3/31/2017 10:45 PM CDT

90-M84 Very faint spot seen in the same field as M86 at 20X with averted vision.  Looked a bit smaller than M86 and to its right. 3/31/2017 11:15 PM CDT

91-M86 Very faint spot seen in the same field as M84at 20X with averted vision.  Looked a bit larger than M84 and to its left. 3/31/2017 11:15 PM CDT

April 3, 2013 – Evening

The weather forecast said the evening would be partly cloudy.  That term can mean a lot of different things around here, everything from what one would normally consider part clouds and part open sky to clear below and clear above a continuous cloud deck.  I did not talk about it much to anyone, but I was hoping for a little open sky at least for a while.  Sure enough, the sky was reasonably clear and very still, did have a bit of a transparency issue in the earlier evening.  I did not think I would be able to go for dim galaxies, but I might be able to see a globular cluster or two that I have left on my list.  Since they would not reach high enough until later in the evening, I waited until nearly ten o’clock to go out.

92-M3:  The sky was very still, but there was a hint of opacity, and a half Moon, so I continued with the idea of at least finding a bright globular.  Bootes was rising nicely in the east, so I decided to go for M3.  I did a triangulation off of Arcturus and Rho and put my red dot finder on the spot that looked about where M3 showed on my Pocket Sky Atlas.  At 13X and a TFOV of a little under 4 degrees, there would be a good chance M3 would be in the field.  It was not, but as soon as I moved the scope upward to search, M3 came into view!

 

I put in a 20mm eyepiece to get 20X.  Not only did I have the nice bright core, but I had a very faint grey circle spreading around the core.  I am not sure if this was some optical effect or I was seeing the outer portions of the glob, but it definitely looked nice.  I do not think I have seen the outer portions of M3 like that before, assuming that is what it is.  I am guessing that my eyes and brain are learning better how to see dim things at low contrast.

I had the one Messier Object, which is really all I was hoping for and the sky seemed to be deteriorating a little, so Jupiter was my next target.  All four moons seemed to be visible with Io and Europa being close on either side of Jupiter.  I played my normal game of trying different eyepieces, with the 10mm winning the contest.  The two equatorial bands were quite evident and the southern temporal band was coming and going.  Occasionally, I could see “box cars” in the main two bands.  Not bad for a less than pristine night and an 80mm f/5 refractor!

After a while, the sky seemed to clear a bit in the Virgo area that I needed for M49!  I could make out several of the main stars, but not Omicron, which is what I had tried to use with little success a few nights before.  This time, I decided to triangulate the spot of M49 using Delta and Epsilon (Vindemiatrix) and put my red dot finder on the spot that matched where my atlas said M49 should be.  I would then search around for a particular star pattern (shown on my finder chart) near the galaxy at 13X.  I worked this method, going back for a new triangulation followed by a search until I finally found the stars I was looking for.

 
The pattern of stars consisted of three in an east/west row, with another one just above the middle of the three.  The right-end star (I am using a correct image diagonal) is brighter than the others.  Imaging traveling down the line of three from left to right, then making a 45 degree turn toward the North.  Traveling along this new path, there is another star about as bright as the right end star in my field.  This second leg is about twice as long as the leg of the first three stars.  M49 showed be in between these two brighter stars.  I could not see the galaxy at 13X, but I did at 20X.  The grey area was centered maybe 40% along the way from the right-end star and the farther one and covered maybe 25 % of the distance between the two stars.  I tried some other magnifications to see if any were better, but none were.  20X was best.

As I was watching M49, it slowly faded away.  I looked up and either thin clouds were moving in or some were forming.  Looking at my watch, it was 11:30 PM.  I decided to pack it in.  I had one more object than I had hoped for and was quite happy.

Session Summary:

92-M3 Very noticeable central core with a surrounding, barely visible circular span of outer stars maybe a half degree or a little less.  Visible at 13X but best at 20X 4/3/2017 10:11 PM CDT

93-M49 Round grey circle reasonably visible at 20X but not at other magnifications.  Located in the correct location of a star pattern on finder chart. 4/3/2017 11:30 PM CDT


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#15 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 07 April 2017 - 04:00 PM

April 7, 2017 – Morning

 

The previous evening, I had determined the Moon was too bright for the dim galaxies I needed to find that were in what would normally be a good part of the sky, even though the sky was calm and clear.  I decided to head in, go to bed early, and try to get up early.  My internal time clock is out of whack right now and I need to get it straightened up anyway.  Getting up early would be tough, but it would be worth the effort, just to get up and attempt to be functional.  I set several alarms on my phone, with the first going off and four, repeating that alarm every five minutes, until the second alarm kicked in and did the same thing until the six o’clock alarm.

 

As I expected, the four o’clock alarm and its repeats originally went unnoticed, but finally started to sink in as five o’clock rolled around.  I managed to stand up and turn the alarm off at five, then stand there with a blank mind and face hanging out for about ten minutes.  Somehow, I managed to be out on the back porch with Atlas, finder charts, shoes on, and a heavy hooded coat (it was a little too cool out) by about 5:20.  The sky was extremely still, but there could have been a tiny bit of haze.  I know there was haze behind my eyes, but there could be some in front as well.

 
I decided to try for M80, a globular cluster near Antares, which was pretty much straight South.

 
94-M80: Unfortunately, by that time of morning, it had moved into a more light polluted section of my sky and I was not sure if I could find it.  I put my red dot finder on Antares and looked through the eyepiece at 13X.  In that field, I could see Antares with Sigma on the right edge of the field.  Moving the scope to the right and up a little, Omicron and Rho  came into view.  I pushed the scope right and up a little more and I could see what looked like a dim fuzzy star…..”I bet that is M80!”  Changing to 20X, the “fuzzy star” was a bit more prominent and bigger.  I went to 40X and it was easier to see still.  I decided to try 44X and it was a bit better.  I then put in an 8mm eyepiece for 50X and it was like somebody had slammed a door!  I could not really make out what I was looking at.  I put the 9mm back in the scope and there M80 was again.  I am not quite sure what is going on, but I think it has a lot to do with my eye and its sensitivity to particular light levels.

 

At one point, I looked at my cell phone and saw the time was 5:30 AM……not bad for a fuzzy head!!

 

From there, I decided to try for M19, a globular cluster to the east of Antares about seven degrees.  It is smaller/dimmer and a bit lower than M80 and would be more of a challenge than M80.  I searched for it for a while but could not find it.  The stars seemed to be dimming down.  I looked up and there was a very thin swathe of cloud passing through the area, just barely discernible.  I decided that was enough for the morning.  The time was about six and the sky should be getting too bright by the time the cloud layer got out of the way, so I went in.

 

Maybe I can do it again tomorrow morning, but this time get up at four!

 

Session Summary:

 

94-M80  Small fuzzy spot WNW of Omicron Scorpii, near Antares.  Was barely discernible at 13X.  Worked to higher magnification and found 44X to be the best. 4/7/2017 05:30 AM CDT


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#16 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 09 April 2017 - 12:33 PM

April 8, 2017 – Morning

 
I managed to hear my cell phone alarm when it went off at 4 AM.  After a bit of wit gathering time, and proper clothing assembly, I managed out the back door and moved scope, astronomy chair, and another chair that serves as a table into position.  I noticed a nice shadow the Moon was making on the far side of my POD observatory, so I set up there to avoid direct glare.  My primary goal was to find M10 and 12, globular clusters in Ophiuchus.  I figured they would be bright enough to be seen, even with light pollution and the Moon in its present condition.  If those were found, M14, M9, and M19 would be next, but I did not know if those were possible under the conditions.

 
95-M10:  Looking up a little to the South and east, I could see the bottom major stars of the Ophiuchus figure and the top stars, but none in between.  It took several attempts from different directions, but I managed to work my way up from the middle bottom star, Zeta to 23 Ophiuchus.  From there it was easy to find 30 Oph., just above 23, with M10 being to the right of 30.  In the view at 13X, with Moon glow and light pollution, M10 looked like a big dim fuzzy star.  At 20X, it was better and more clearly defined, but not as bright as I remember it being.  Trying different magnifications, up to 44X, the 20X seemed to be the best.  The time was around 4:55 AM CDT.

96-M12:  From M12, I moved the scope to the west (right for me) and North (or up) a little and M12 came into view.  I still had the 20mm eyepiece in place for 20X and made no changes before trying for M12.  I simply observed it a little while and see if any details revealed themselves.  It seemed a bit brighter than M10, but no distinguishing features in the grey spot.  The time was about 5:00.

 
97-M14:  This globular should be a piece of cake, being very near the left side middle star of the Ophiuchus figure.  However, I could not see that star under the conditions.  I could see the bottom left corner star and the top left corner star, but not that middle one.  I had to poke around for a while, putting my red dot on where I thought the star should be, and then checking out the area.  I finally found the star, then went about three degrees, I think, North and east to M14, using the 20mm eyepiece.  Sure enough, M14 was there…..just barely, a dim grey spot.  It was dimmer than either M10 or M12.  The time for that one was about 5:15.

 
I tried for a while to find M19 and then M9, but they were simply not there for me.  Finally, I decided I would simply have to wait for another time, put everything up, and went in.  I was happy at meeting my goal of finding M10 and M12 globular clusters, with the bonus of finding M14.

 
Session Summary:

 
95-M10 Appeared as a dim fuzzy star at 13X.  20X showed a dim grey patch with the moonlight and light pollution. Tried several magnifications 20X was best. 4/8/2017 04:55 AM CDT

96-M12 Dim grey spot in the moonlight and light pollution, about 4 or 5 degrees to the right and higher than M10 at 20X, both in the middle of Ophiuchus. 4/8/2017 05:00 AM CDT

 
97-M14 Dim grey spot in the moonlight and light pollution, dimmer than M10 and M12 at 20X. Located about half way up the left side of Ophiuchus' house figure. 4/8/2017 05:15 AM CDT


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#17 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 15 April 2017 - 11:50 AM

April 14, 2017 – Evening

 
During the day, the sky promised to be at least a reasonably good one in the evening.  The Moon was not supposed to rise for a few hours, and the weather forecast called for at least cloudy and some rainy weather for several days afterward.  Toward evening, the sky was almost totally clear and the wind had calmed down, at least in my back yard.

 
I decided this was definitely a good time to set out the Infinity 80, astronomy chair, another plastic chair that serves as a low table, my pocket sky atlas, and clip board of finder charts for the Messier Objects remaining for me to find.

 
As the sky started darkening, Jupiter in the ESE was in plain sight and later Arcturus began to show as well farther to the North maybe 30 degrees.  While I waited on other stars that I would need for finding Messier Objects to show up, I decided to look at Jupiter for a while.  Judging by Arcturus’s twinkling, I judged seeing to be 3 of 5.  Transparency was not the best I had seen, so I rated it a 3.  Even with those conditions, I could see the two equatorial bands on Jupiter very well, with I think, the Southern Temperate Band giving indication occasionally.  I could see darkening at both poles.  Three of the moons were spread out quite a bit, in a North/South sense on the right side, assuming they were all moons, and one was on the left.  The whole view was quite pretty and unusual.

 
M60 and M59:  Alpha and Beta Leonis came into view and following their line as a pointer and spreading out my hand and using it as a measure, I finally found Vindemiatrix or Epsilon Virgo.  This was my starting point a previous evening that was interrupted with the rise of the moon, and I had a good idea in my mind how to go to get to these galaxies.  From Epsilon, I had to go about four degrees almost straight west.  This was more up and to the right with their position in the east.  There were three small stars below and a little to the west of Epsilon on the chart, which I located and use to get my bearings at 13X.  I moved to scope in the direction I needed until I located Rho Virgo with the recognizable three stars around it that show in my atlas.  To the left and up from Rho is 36 Virgo, which I used to locate the area that M60 and M59 should be, just about and roughly between those two stars.  Moving the scope to make those two stars on the outer edge to the lower right, I could see an indication of M60, but not M59, which should be in the field and about a degree away.  Changing to 20X, M60 became more distinct and M59 became apparent.  I looked at my watch and it showed 9:05 PM.

 
M58:  This galaxy should be west of M58 about a degree, but when I moved the scope, I could not see it.  Eventually, I started questioning myself, and began circling around from below M60 with some other relatively bright (in my field) stars, consulting both atlas and finder chart, I gradually circled around and came at M58 from its southwest.  I finally saw M58, then moved the scope back to where I thought M59 should be and found it, then moved the scope a bit more and re-found M60, M59 and M60 were in the right spots related to the star pattern as they were before.  M58 was where it was supposed to be when I moved back to it.  I am not sure why I could not see it at first, other than the idea is that it may be a bit dimmer than either of the other two.

 
M90:  This galaxy is located about a degree and a half North of M58 and a touch farther west, going by the charts.  However, the angle in my view confused me for a while.  I headed in the wrong direction at first and found a very dim indication of a galaxy that I believe is NGC 4584.  However, the stars around it simply did not match what the charts showed.

 
Going back to M58, I tried again and found two lines of stars that formed a lop-sided tee and was finally able to follow them to M90.  Even with the 20mm eyepiece in the scope, M90 showed up as a very vague indication of a grey spot.  The star pattern around the grey spot were correct when compared to my charts, so I know I had the galaxy.  There were no details in it at all, just a roundish indication of grey.  My watch showed 9:32 PM CDT.

 
M5:  This is a globular cluster near Alpha Coma Berenices.  However, I could see no indication of that star.  I fiddled around for a while trying to find it, but being very doubtful of having the right star.  I finally did a triangulation, using Arcturus and Vindemiatrix, which I could see, and found a bright star.  My charts showed a distinctive pattern of lesser stars roughly in a line and northwest of Alpha.  Moving the scope in what I thought was the right direction at 13X, I did find the stars and an indication of M5 near that line on the Alpha side.  With higher magnifications all the way to 40X the cluster became brighter.  But, at 40X, I was losing my perspective somehow.  I am thinking something in the range of 20X or 28X, 20 and 15mm eyepieces, were the best views.  Looking at my watch, it showed 9:50 PM CDT.

 
M61:  I apparently got my finder charts for M5 and M61 out of order, because I found myself going back to Virgo.  This time, I decided to try for this galaxy from another direction.  Before, I had tried to come down from Beta Leonis to Omicron Virgo and star hop that way, but I got lost on several attempts.  This time, I decided to start at Porrima (Gamma Virgo).  I could consistently see Gamma, and from there found Eta winking at me occasionally about five degrees to the west of Gamma.  Eta was to Gamma’s upper right from my perspective.  I put my red dot on Eta and viewed it through the scope at 13X.  My atlas showed 16 Virgo straight North of Eta about four degrees.  Moving the scope to put Eta directly on  the edge of my field, where I thought South should be and pushing a little farther, I found 16 Virgo.  From there, I moved 16 near the edge of the field enough to put where I thought M61 would be in the middle.

 
Putting in the 20mm eyepiece, then later the 15mm, I finally saw it.  The image was a very dim grey spot.  This is probably the toughest one for me to see an indication during this session.  If the star pattern had not matched up as well as it did, I would not have been as confident in the find.

 
M64:  Now back to Coma Berenices.  This is the Black Eye Galaxy, known for having a dark strip of dust along one side.  It is not directly face on and should be an oval if the dark dust lane was not present.

 
Doing a triangulation with Arcturus and Vindemiatrix, I once again found Alpha Coma Berenices at 13X.  From there, I moved to 35 CB, which is about five degrees northeast of Alpha.  I did it with a curving sweep to the right and up, following the star pattern through 36 CB and a distinctive five-star group along the way.  M64 is about a degree NW or 35 CB and was slightly visible at 13X.  Moving to 20X, it looked a bit like a longish strip of grey.  At 40X, I could see a definite oval, running up and down in my field, with a flattish side on the left (using a correct image diagonal).  The time was 10:25 PM CDT.

 
The stars I needed for my next object were not visible yet and would not be in a good position until after I expected the Moon to come up.  Though I wanted to go on, this had ended up being the single-most productive session I have had with this Messier run that I can remember.  I packed things up and went in happy.

 
Session Summary:

 
98-M60 Grey Spot discernible at 13X but definite at 20X, about5 Deg west of Vindemiatrix.  Followed star pattern from Vindemiatrix to M60. 4/14/2017 09:05 PM CDT

 
99-M59 Grey Spot about one degree west and in same field as M60.  Not apparent at 13X, but visible at 20X 4/14/2017 09:05 PM CDT

 
100-M58 Grey Spot about one degree west of M59.  Area a bit confusing and came at it from two different directions to verify the object.  Required 20X to see. 4/14/2017 09:15 PM CDT

 
101-M90 Grey area that was discernible at 20X.  Was confused by another smaller galaxy NGC 4584 until I figured out the field stars. 4/14/2017 09:32 PM CDT

 
102-M53 Globular Cluster showing as round grey spot about one degree NW of Alpha Coma Berenices.  Verified with line of stars to its North. Apparent at 13X, better at 20X. 4/14/2017 09:50 PM CDT

 
103-M61 Very dim galaxy near 16 Virgo and a little over 5 deg North of Eta Virgo.  Indications at 20X but more apparent at 28X.  Very tough to see. 4/14/2017 10:15 PM CDT

 
104-M64 Black Eye Galaxy NW of 35 Coma Berenices and five deg NE of Alpha.  Visible as longish grey spot at 13X but could not discern flat side until reaching 40X.   4/14/2017 10:25 PM CDT


  • RickScofield likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#18 E Sully

E Sully

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 45 posts

Posted 15 April 2017 - 01:50 PM

Very impressive job hunting them down with a small scope.  I wish I had your determination.


  • MistrBadgr likes this

#19 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2744 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 15 April 2017 - 02:07 PM

The challenge is fun for me!  People will put up with just about anything in the name of fun. :)  Mostly, I am trying to prove to myself that the Messier Objects can all be found from the suburbs with a rather small entry level scope.


  • SBacon likes this
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#20 RickScofield

RickScofield

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 259 posts
  • LocationBellevue,Nebraska

Posted 15 April 2017 - 07:27 PM

Bill,
I bet your wife thinks your crazy. I know my wife thinks I am.
Thanks for sharing your session notes with us.
RickScofield
  • MistrBadgr and SBacon like this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users