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Messier Hunt with an Infinity 80, Targets 71 through 110


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#1 MistrBadgr

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Posted 09 December 2016 - 05:34 PM

I am going to try and put the last third of the Targets in this one string of posts.  I have no idea if they will come in large batches or if they will come just a couple at a time, like this morning.  Anyway, here goes:

 

December 9, 2016-Morning

 

The alarm went off at 5 AM and I was up like a shot.  Fifteen minutes later, I was outside, dressed properly (feet down the right pant legs, etc.) and encumbered with the correct clothing for 13 Deg F weather, telescope in place, and eyes trying to focus!  After some preliminary efforts at Jupiter, I decided I was prepared enough to try for M65 and M66

71-M66 and 72-M65:  The Leo Triplet of galaxies are located about half way along a line from Theta to Iota Leonis.  Theta is in the position of the lower edge of the body of the lion and about where the bottom of the hip would be.  Iota is located southeast of Theta about five degrees in the position of the rear knee.  M65 is directly on the line in my atlas with M66 just to the east of it.  NGC 3628, the third galaxy is North of M66.  All three can be enclosed by a one degree circle.

 

Just to the west of the trio is a curved arrangement of stars that reminds me of a question mark.  The brightest star of that curving group is 73 Leonis, which shows in my regular atlas with its number.  There is roughly a tenth magnitude star to the east of 73 that forms the top left end of the question mark.  That star is almost between M65 and NGC 3628.

With my scope centered on where I thought the middle of the trio should be, at 16X, about a degree east of 73 Leonis, I waited for a while and could see a vague vertical spot of lighter grey, which I guessed was M66.  I switched eyepieces to 32X and waited.  The first spot was definitely there.  In a minute or so, a second vertical swatch of grey showed up.  The tenth magnitude star was above that swatch, so that much be M65.  Looking slightly above the star and a little to the left, I could see a vague lightening in the background that seems circular or nearly so to me.  This was in the spot where NGC 3628 is indicated in my atlas.

 

After that, I attempted to move on to a whole cluster of galaxies east of Beta Leonis, the lion’s tail star.  However, I started having trouble seeing things.  Both contrast was decreasing as well as the brightness of stars.  I looked to see if my objective was frosting up, but did not see anything.  Possibly, a thin cloud had moved in the way.  At that point, I noticed that my toes were getting past cold and were getting a bit numb, so I decided to call the session to an end.  I was out about 45 minutes all together, a little shorter than I would have liked, but successful for this quest, none the less.

 

Session Summary:

71-M66:  Located between Theta and Iota Leonis. Appeared and a vertically elongated grey patch east of 73 Leonis and just east of M65.  Spotted at 16x, best view at 32X. 12/9/2016 05:40 AM CST

 

72-M65:  Located between Theta and Iota Leonis. Appeared and a vertically elongated grey patch east of 73 Leonis and just west of M66.  Spotted and viewed at 32X. 12/9/2016 05:45AM CST


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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#2 MistrBadgr

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 06:41 PM

December 29, 2016 – Morning

 

I woke up before 5 AM and was outside, setting my astronomy chair in place when my phone alarm went off.  I am not sure how that happened, but I am glad it did.  The sky was great and the temperature was around 33 deg F.  By 5:05, I was warming up with Jupiter.  I managed to pick out part of the Northern Temperate Belt as well as mottling in the two equatorial belts.  For the Infinity 80 and my artificial eye lenses, that is doing pretty good!  I had made a 70mm orifice mask to try out on Jupiter and had it hanging on the azimuth control knob’s cable, but forgot to try it.  That, or an 82A filter might help some more.

 
With that done, I thought it was time to start on Messier Objects.  Since it had been 20 days from my last Messier session, I was not sure if I would have much success, if any, or if this would simply be a warm-up session to get me ready for the next time.

 

73-M98:  This one is located about six degrees east of Beta Leonis, or Denebola.  I went for my longest focal length Plossl, which gives me over 3.5 degrees of true field, and centered my red dot finder on Denebola.  This star is just about at zenith at this time of the morning now, and was readily apparent.  This area is, fortunately, far enough North that it missing a rather high light pollution area to my South, so the conditions were pretty good.  Moving the scope eastward, I was able to locate 6 Coma Berenices.  This is the right end star of several that form what looks like a Tee that was in an accident and bent the bottom line a little.  M98 is supposed to be straight west of that star about a degree.

 

At that point, I started moving down the line of eyepieces, trying to find the one that would work the best for me, but thinking it would end up being my 5000 series 5 element 9mm Plossl, but was surprised to find that a 12.5mm four element Possl did better this time.  What I found that worked best for me this session was to use a 25mm eyepiece to locate the right stars near a galaxy, then switch to the 12.5 and wait for the object to show up.

 

This ended up being the case for M98.  Just a little wait, I could see a definite grey patch, which is what I saw with all of these objects.  I did not see anything definite, like a brighter center or anything like that, just a general lightening of the field in the area where my finder chart said they should be, based on the surrounding stars.  I was using one chart from the Uranometria, that I had scanned and circled the Messier objects on it.

 

74-M99:  From M98, I moved over to the middle star in the bent stem of the tee.  Sure enough, there was a brightening of the background just to the right of that star.  Again, there were no details to be seen, just a general area that was a little brighter grey than the background around it.  With this one, I did not put the longer focal length lens in the telescope, I just stayed with the 12.5 mm Plossl.

 

75-M100:  Next, I moved back up to the top “bar” of the tee and moved to the left end (eastern) and kept going along that line for another half degree or so.  Again, there was a grey area that was lighter than the background where M100 was supposed to be.  I studied it for a little bit to see if any details would show up, but they did not.

 

76-M88:  At this point, I put the 25mm eyepiece back in the scope and compared what I saw with my finder chart.  At that point, there was another object just above M100 that I should have gone for, but it was off this particular chart and I will have to go back to it.  Instead, I decided to make a counter-clockwise sweep in the area and head toward the southeast.  On the finder chart, M88 is roughly three degrees SE of M100, about a half degree from what looked to be a seventh magnitude star on the chart.  Sure enough, I found the star and the spot M88 was supposed to be.  Switching back to the 12.5mm eyepiece, I made out the grey area, exactly where it was supposed to be.

 

77-M91:  This galaxy is supposed to be about a degree and a quarter to the east of M88.  Using just the 12.5mm eyepiece, I moved the scope east and a grey spot came into view.  I looked back and forth between M88 and M91 to verify a line of three Mag 9 stars running just above the galaxies and found them for verification that I was looking at the correct objects.  The star pattern matched the chart.

 

78-M87:  After M91, and looking at my chart, I put the 25mm eyepiece back in the scope and centered on M88.  I then dropped Southward about two degrees to a Mag 7 star.  This star is on the left end of a somewhat curved line of four Mag 7 stars.  When I looked at the pattern, what stood out to me was a couple pair of equally matched stars that were lined up vertically, and the line of four stars was not quite as noticeable, even though I could see the line well.  M87 showed on my chart to be about a half degree to the NW or that first star that is the east end of the four making up the curved line.  I switched to the 12.5 mm eyepiece and waited a little while.  M87 became apparent, again, as a dim grey area.

 

79-M89 is located to the east of M87 about a degree and a half, between two Mag 9 stars, with a third one to the North, making a triangle.  M87 is basically on the southern line of that triangle.  I just moved the scope to the area, with the 12.5 mm eyepiece in place and saw M89’s grey patch.

 

From that point, I decided to head to the general area of M84 and M85, which are about two degrees NW of M87.  I actually made the move to the area, consulting my chart and looking in the scope with the 25mm eyepiece.  I moved to the 12.5 eyepiece and was trying to verify small stars when the batteries in my red flashlight went out.

 

At that point, I had found seven objects, was going to have to go back into the house to get more batteries, and realized I was fairly tired and cold.  That is good enough for one session!

 

Reviewing charts when I came inside, I realized there were several more in the area, enough to catch another six or seven another time.  By the way, when I came inside and looked at the clock, it showed 6:30.

 

Session Summary:

 

73-M98:  Located about 6 deg east of Beta Leonis, the tail star in the Lion, and maybe a degree west of 6 Coma Berenices.  Saw dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 05:30AM CST

 

74-M99:  Located about a degree SE of 6 Coma Berenices, near M98.  Saw dim grey area at 32X.   12/29/2016 05:35AM CST

 

75-M100:  Located about two degrees NE of 6 Coma Berenices, near M98 and 99.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 05:40AM CST

 

76-M88:  Located about 3 degrees SE of M100.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 05:50AM CST

 

77-M91:  Located about a degree east of M88. Saw a dim grey area at 32X. 12/29/2016 05:55AM CST

 

78-M87:  Located about two degrees South of M88 and a touch west.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X 12/29/2016 06:05AM CST

 

79-M89:  Located maybe a degree and a quarter east of M87.  Saw a dim grey area at 32X. 12/29/2016 06:10AM CST


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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 SBacon

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:12 AM

Wow!  That's a lot of viewing for an hour and a half!

 

Really enjoying your posts.

 

Steve



#4 MistrBadgr

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 05:18 PM

Thanks, Steve!  I enjoy writing them!  The only part that is not enjoyable sometimes is getting my body to cooperate that early  in the morning!!!

 

Bill


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#5 MistrBadgr

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 08:43 PM

December 31, 2016 – Morning

 

I managed to make it outside around 5:30 AM.  I was not sure what the sky would be like.  The forecast I had was a saying partly cloudy during the day, but I did not know when that would start.  I found the sky more turbulent than it had been the last session and very thin clouds were moving in from the northwest and had already taken over the area I have been finding galaxies on the 29th.

After I set everything up in a hurry, I remembered there were some objects in the area of Corvus, but I could not remember exactly what.  Going to my Pocket Sky Atlas, I found that there was a globular cluster, M68, and a spiral galaxy, M104 or the Sombrero Galaxy, in the area.

 

80-M68:  This globular cluster is located maybe four degrees SSE of Beta Corvi, the southeastern of the four major stars in the figure.  I had my 30 mm Plossl in the eyepiece holder of the Infinity 80 refractor and put the red dot of the finder on Beta Corvi, which was quite apparent directly South and uncomfortably close to house tops.

 

From that position, I moved the scope in a SSE direction until an unlabeled fifth magnitude star came into view.  The star has an A number associated with it, so it is a double or multiple star, but I was not paying attention to that at the time.  M68 is located NE of that star less than a degree.  I switched to a 12.5mm eyepiece and was able to make out a grey fuzzy circular area in the right location.  I observed the area for a few minutes, hoping to see some differences in the grey toward the center, but could not.

 

81-M104:  This is the Sombrero Galaxy.  It is located roughly five degrees NE of Delta Corvi, the northeastern major star in the figure.  Eta if very close, ENE, of Delta and is quite apparent.  There is somewhat of a path of dimmer stars heading off to the NE, which I followed.  The last few show to be double stars in the atlas, which turned out to look more like small clusters of stars.  The very last double star, that is next to M104 on its right, turned out to be four stars with three of them in a row, and the forth one was down and to the right of the end star of the three.  This end star of the three appeared to be the primary of the group.  I am not sure if all four stars are part of a multiple star system, but it looked quite nice and kept distracting me as I was observing the Sombrero.

 

I kept looking at the grey spot and it seemed to have something different about it.  Sometimes there seemed to be a flat bottom to the grey area with a little of the grey below somehow, then the bottom  would go away on me.  When this happened the orientation of the galaxy seemed to change. 

 

After a while, I looked up and saw that the clouds were about to overtake the one area I had to observe, so I decided to call it quits.  The rest of the objects I had researched and had finder charts for were involved with thin clouds.  I could see some stars through the clouds, but knew I would not be able to see the objects I was after.

 

Session Summary:

 

80-M68:  Globular Cluster approximately 4 deg SSE of Beta Corvii.  Saw relatively large round grey patch at 32X. 12/31/2016 05:35 AM CST

 

81-M104:  Sombrero Galaxy approximately 5 deg NNE of Delta Corvii.  Saw dim grey, somewhat elongated patch at 32X 12/31/2016 05:45 AM CST

 

Bill Steen


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#6 MistrBadgr

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 06:38 AM

January 1, 2017 – Morning

 

I made it outside a little before 5 AM to find the sky mostly covered with thin clouds in the area I have been working.  The only open area was to the southeast.  With the speed the clouds were moving toward the southeast, I did not think I had much chance of finding any new Messier objects.  However, there was one in that area, very low and just barely above house tops that might be workable.  I managed to get everything set up get my red dot finder on Spica as my starting point.

 

Before I could get going, the clouds hit the area.  Looking around, I could see an end to the patch in the northwest.  Since everything seemed to be moving pretty fast, I decided to just sit there and wait it out.  I had a nice time just looking around and listening to some coyotes howling in the distance.  Some dogs were barking in the direction the coyotes were howling, so it might have been in response.  Eventually, the clouds cleared and I could start.

 

82-M83:  The Seashell Galaxy is located about 18 degrees South of Spica.  The closest visible star from my back yard is Gamma Hydra.  This star is located about eleven degrees South of Spica and is just above a line coming from Epsilon through Beta Corvus.  From Gamma, the trail is difficult for me to describe.  There is a very ragged smattering trail of stars leading SSE from Gamma to M83, which is about eight degrees away.  I simply had to memorize the pattern and verify it back and forth from eyepiece to atlas.  I finally made my way there and started using my finder chart from Uranometria 2000.  I could see a vertical arch of three stars to the west of where M83 is supposed to be and another one slightly to the east of that spot.  These were all in the Mag 6 range. 

 

Switching eyepieces from 30mm to 12.5, I centered the field on the spot where the galaxy is supposed to be and simply waited.  Shortly, an image started to form as my eye and visual memory saturated.  It was just barely apparent, but was there.

 

With this object being so low in my sky, I do not think I would ever be able to see any detail from it with a small scope, even if I went to a dark location.  I would need to travel South a few degrees from my 36 degrees N latitude or use a larger scope.

 

After studying the grey spot for a while, trying to see any real shape or detail, I looked at my watch and saw that it was nearly 6 AM and time to go in.  My time flies when you are having fun!

 

Session Summary:

 

82-M83:  Seashell Galaxy approximately 8 deg SE of Gamma Hydra.  Very faint grey area at 32X.  No details to be seen 1/1/2017 05:45 AM CST

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#7 Philip Pugh

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 12:13 PM

I find the Leo triplet needs good conditions. If I can't get M65 and M66, I know I can forget about the Virgo Supercluster.



#8 MistrBadgr

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 05:07 PM

I have not thought about it that way, but you are definitely right!  M65 and M66 had more definition to them than what I am finding in Virgo. :)


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#9 Philip Pugh

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 01:50 PM

It's more noticeable from the UK but the Virgo cluster galaxies are further down in the murk!

 

I bagged M79 from Chicago with 15x70 bins but cannot from the UK.



#10 MistrBadgr

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 07:14 AM

January 7, 2017 – Morning

 

The alarm clock went off at 4 AM.  (enough said.)  After getting properly dressed for 7 deg F, I made it outside with clipboard of finder charts and Sky and Telescope’s Pocket Sky Atlas.  I put out the Infinity 80, astronomy chair, and a plastic lawn chair I use to set things on.  Looking up, the handle of the Big Dipper was calling me somehow.  I had intended to go back to the cluster of galaxies east of Leonis, but I changed my mind on a whim.

 

83-M101:  I found the right finder chart and looked at my note on it that said M101 was on Atlas page 42.  Finding it on that page of the atlas, I saw that it is located near the club of Bootes and the star Kappa Bootes, in particular.  I did manage visually locate Theta Bootes and finally got a wink from Kappa.  Placing my red dot finder on the spot I thought the wink came from and looking in the 30mm eyepiece I had in place, I could definitely see it.  Pulling the scope around a bit, I verified Theta, Kappa, and Lambda Bootes near Kappa.  Using the line formed by Lambda and Kappa Bootes as my guide, I started out in the direction of M101, attempting to verify my way with dimmer star patterns.  I always have trouble in new areas, especially those more toward the North.  I had to go back to Kappa and start over several times, but eventually made my way to the area where M101 is located, verifying the dim stars near it on my finder chart.

 

Once in the right area, I switched to a 20mm Plossl, focused, and waited.  Sure enough, a grey area began to form.  At that magnification, the dim grey area seemed fairly round with some mottling in it, and sometimes seemed to have a slightly brighter spot in the middle.  I tried several different magnifications, but 2X seemed to give me more clarity, which is different than I have experienced in the past.  This amounted to a 4mm pupil size instead of something around 2mm or less that I normally need to find galaxies.

 

84-M102:  Since I was in the general area of 102, I decided to try for it.  Rather than moving to a major star and working toward the object, I decided to try and follow the stars shown on my atlas and see if I could work my way across to M102.  It took me a while to match and verify stars.  In fact, I moved past it until I found a string of star pairs in the mag 5 or 6 range that I could identify with certainty.  From there, I worked my way backwards to a triangle of stars that gave me a good reference.  The M102 that I was targeting is NGC 5866.  There are supposed to be two other galaxies in the immediate vicinity of M102, and I believe I located one of those (NGC 5879) and might have seen evidence of (NGC 5907).  5907 was very, very dim and what I saw may have been more my wishful thinking that the galaxy in truth.  The other two were definitely visible, though dim.

 

85-M51:  After M102, I decided to stay in the area and go on the other side of the Big Dipper’s handle.  M51 is not far from the end star of the handle, Eta Ursa Majoris.  I found that star and put my red dot on it and changed to the 30mm Plossl.  I could see Eta and 24 Ursa Majoris, about 2 ½ degrees to the east of Eta.  M51 is another 2 ½ deg to the SSE of 24, forming a rather balanced triangle between Eta, 24, and M51 with the Eta to M51 leg being longer than the other two.  I confirmed three probably mag 7 stars that almost form an equilateral triangle that almost touches M51 on my charts.  Switching to the 20mm eyepiece, I waited.  Sure enough, a grey area showed up, but it was surprisingly dimmer than either M101 or M102!  Eventually, I could make out that it was not round, but more elongated toward the North, sort of pear shaped.  This is what I was waiting for.

 

I started looking at my charts for the next object and decided on M63, the Sunflower Galaxy, and looked at the spot in the sky where it should be.  By this time, the spot was nearly overhead.  By this time, it was approaching 6 AM and I had been out in the 7 degree weather for an hour and a half, just sitting.  My toes were starting to tingle in a way that I do not like.  I wanted to stay out, but decided not to play with the cold and end up doing something stupid.  Three rather difficult objects on a cold morning like this is a success in my universe, so I headed in.

 

Session Summary:

 

83-M101: SG located approximately 3 deg NNE of Kappa Bootes (end of Bootes' club).  Saw large round dim grey area,  brightening a little in middle, at 20X. 1/7/2017 05:10 AM CST

84-M102: SG (NGC 5866) located approx 4 deg SSE of Lambda Draconis and eight deg west of M101.  Oval grey area maybe a little brighter in middle at 20X. 1/7/2017 05:25 AM CST

85-M51  Whirlpool Galaxy located approx 4 deg SE of Eta Ursa Major (tip of Big Dipper’s handle)  Saw slightly elongated grey area at 20X. 1/7/2017 05:45 AM CST 


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#11 MistrBadgr

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 09:01 AM

January 9.2017 – Morning

 

I woke up before the 4 AM alarm went off, rummaged around for a little while waking up and getting all suited up for the cold.  The outside thermometer, which I can read inside the house showed 23 deg F.  By 4:15 I was outside and set up with the Infinity 80, astronomy chair, plastic chair I use for a table, a bunch of eyepieces, Sky and Telescope’s Pocket Sky Atlas, red flashlight, and finder charts.  The Clear Sky Chart on the astrotulsa.com website showed no clouds, medocre seeing and transparency, and a two hour window between the moon going down and the sun coming up from about 4AM to 6AM.

 

Since the Sunflower Galaxy (M63) and M94 had proven to be nearly overhead at the end of my session the last time, I decided to go for them first.  Looking at page 43 in the atlas I could see they were both North and east of Alpha and Beta Canes Venatici. (Cor Caroli and Chara)

 

86-M63:  The Sunflower Galaxy is located about five degrees NE of Cor Caroli.  Looking up, I could see that star easily.  With a little patience, I could make out Chara.  I put the red dot of my finder, with a little body twisting, on the spot I thought M63 should be, based on the positions of the two stars.  I missed just a little bit, when I looked through the 30mm Plossl, but I was not far off.  I identified a trio of nearby stars.  Though there is a little conflict in labeling between my atlas and finder charts from Uranometria, I believe they are 18, 19, and 20 CV.  M 63 shows to be a little over a degree North of 19 CV, which proved to be correct.  With a little movement of the scope, the galaxy was apparent as a grey elongated oval at 13X.  Switching to the 20mm, I could see a larger area with some indication of the center  portion being brighter.

 

87-M94:  From M63, I tried at first to move to M94 directly, using my star maps as a guide and identifying various stars along the way.  I made it about a third of the way and identified a group of four readily identifiable stars, but became stuck there.  There is a significantly large gap with no stars from that point to where M94 is supposed to be located, so I changed tactics.

 

I put my red dot finder on Chara, Beta CV, and saw it in the eyepiece.  From there I moved to 9 CV and on to another dimmer star in a line with Beta and 9.  From there, I headed toward Cor Caroli, Alpha DV,  and noticed another reasonably bright star off the line from Beta to Alpha.  Looking at my charts and moving the scope around a bit, I decided that reasonably bright star was 10 CV.  The charts showed me that M94 should be on the other side of the Alpha Beta line from 10 CV and about twice as far off the line.  I headed in that direction, but missed the galaxy.  I found a string of stars just past the galaxy that I could identify, especially a group of four making a lopsided diamond in the string, that had one double star.  M94 should be on a line from the double star through the star across the diamond and on about a degree.  In about that location, there were three 8 and 9 Mag stars forming a triangle with a relatively bright “nugget” in the midst of the stars and on a line between two of them, closest to the dimmest of the three. 

 

By that time, I had switched to the 20mm eyepiece from the 30, so the discovery is listed as being at 20X.  However, I believe it would be visible at 13X if I had understood what the size of the galaxy would be.  I thought at the time that this galaxy must have a bright center with the rest being very dim and would have to look up pictures of it when I went inside.  Later, after the session, the image brought up by the AutoStar program showed a bright core with a rather small, almost circular disk around it.

 

From M94, I tried to go back where I had left off just east of Leo to find the last two galaxies in that area.  I started with Beta Leo, but had a hard time finding 6 Coma Berenices for some reason.  I finally found it and started working my way toward M84 and M86, following lesser stars.  The stars seemed to get harder to see as I went along.  When I reached the place where M84 should be, I could not see any sign of it.  Scanned around referring to my charts to make sure I was in the right spot, and I believe I was. 

 

About then, the stars seemed to dim some more and I looked up.  A wavy blanket of very thin clouds was moving over and had been for a while.  Looking back over my shoulder, I could not see any opening in the blanket that would be in position before the sun came up.  Time to pack up and go in.  Well, I had not known what to expect that morning, due to what the Clear Sky Chart had shown and did not expect to have much success.  Instead, I found two Messier Objects.  It was a good session!

 

Session Summary:

 

86-M63:  SG located approximately 5 deg  NW of Alpha Canes Venatici.  Elongated grey patch apparent at 13X but best seen at 20X 1/9/2017 04:40 AM CST

 

87-M94:  Small readily apparent grey "nugget" about 40% of the way between Alpha and Beta Canes Venatici and 1 1/2 deg to the left of that line.  Best at 20X 1/9/2017 05:15 AM CST


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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#12 Philip Pugh

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Posted 03 February 2017 - 01:21 PM

Do you have a dark site? I bagged the Messier objects from suburbia but used a 127 Mak and not an 80mm 'scope. Most nights I could get down to Mag 9 but anything fainter needed a really clear night, so that's why it took me four years!

 

What really helped me was a 9x50 RA finderscope, which even showed M33 from a dark site and a focal reducer, giving an effective focal length eyepiece of 64mm.

 

Due to persistent manful and bad weather, I am more on the photographic side these days. I've thought about trying to snap the Messier objects but doubt whether I can get them all without a motor-driven mount.



#13 MistrBadgr

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 08:14 AM

Hi Phillip,

 

I am trying to get as many as I can from my suburban back yard as an experiment.  For some, it definitely is taking a clear night.  On a very good series of three nights a few years ago, I was able to identify the super nova in M-82 with a 60mm f/11 refractor when the SN was at mag 10 from the same location.....just barely.  This location shows to be a dark red zone on the most recent dark sky map.

 

I have one more object that I have not reported about yet, M106.  I did it just before getting sick with a virus.  As my head becomes less fuzzy, I will write something about it, but am waiting some more for my lungs to clear up before venturing out in the cold again.  Hopefully, that will happen soon.

 

Bill


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma




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