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Wizard Nebula


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#1 SBacon

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 09:36 AM

This guy is almost invisible to my camera!  I guess that's why they call him the Wizard Nebula.  45 shots, 2 min each, ISO 3200.

 

Steve

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#2 MistrBadgr

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 12:07 PM

Hi Steve,

 

Either that or you have to be a wizard to get a picture of it yourself! :)

 

Seems to be an interesting combination of radiation and reflection nebula.

 

Bill


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 SBacon

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 07:22 AM

Hi Bill,

 

I really thought it would show up better with 90 mins exposure.  I should have went with ISO 6400.  I may try to shoot again next opportunity.  Two minutes tracking is about all my scope will do on the wedge without star trailing.  Is that normal?  To track longer do I need to invest in an autoguider?  Any suggestions on autoguiders will be appreciated.

 

Steve



#4 spiral

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 11:27 AM

Hi Bill,

 

I really thought it would show up better with 90 mins exposure.  I should have went with ISO 6400.  I may try to shoot again next opportunity.  Two minutes tracking is about all my scope will do on the wedge without star trailing.  Is that normal?  To track longer do I need to invest in an autoguider?  Any suggestions on autoguiders will be appreciated.

 

Steve

I have heard around the forums on long exposure shots, whether it be EQ or wedge, Its all about the guiding.. :D And I have heard on SCT, that an off axis guider is best..



#5 MistrBadgr

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 01:16 PM

You guys know more about it than I do! :)

 

I have noticed that the people I know that have been doing imaging for a long time all do autoguiding.

 

The little LPI-G that I have is supposed to work as an autoguider as well, but I do not know anything other than what I read..

 

Bill


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#6 SBacon

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 05:08 AM

Thanks guys for your comments.  That's exactly what I had in mind, an off-axis guider using the Mead LPI-G as the guider.  It would really be nice to hear the pros and cons from someone on this forum that has actually done this with an 8" LX90.

 

Steve






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