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#1 RickScofield

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 03:20 PM

I am looking for advice regardings eyepiece filters. Looking for something to assist with looking at objects in the solar system including the moon as well as something to deal with blocking city lights. I also understand that there is filtering available to assist with looking at deep sky objects, (nebula). I'm using a MEADE LX 90 8" with the majority of my eyepices being 1.25.
Thank You,
RickScofield

#2 Mark Sibole

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 04:20 PM

for planets red light green and yellow are good to pick up different details.To enhance nebula emissions  ive used the Lumicon ha night sky filter with good success.

http://www.lumicon.c...ha-Filters.aspx

Meade used to offer a nebula filter but i dont know if they still do and Ive never used it.

I generally mention equipment ive used and dont endorse any specific brand.Only what I have used here.

Hope this helps

 

Mark


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Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com

#3 MeadeGuy

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 08:34 AM

Hi Rick! 

 

Meade currently offers a nice color filter set #07530 for planetary use mainly, it typically sells for $59. For the Moon we have what we call a ND96 neutral density filter and Variable Polarizing Filter item 07286 both of which help knock down the tremendous glare you get with bigger scopes.  

 

Mark is correct, Meade isn't currently selling a nebular filter or broadband type light pollution filter, at least for the moment. If you can find one we used to sell the Meade Broadband and Narrowband (more restrictive obviously) filters. The Broadband was quite popular, and you might still find new inventory out there at the bigger dealers.

 

Best Regards, 

 

John Piper

Customer Service Manager

Meade Instruments Corp. 


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#4 RickScofield

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 05:48 PM

Mark and John Thank you both for the useful advice and the link.
John I have a follow up question regarding the Meade broadband filters you spoke of above, are you referring to the Meade Seies 4000 Broadband Filters? Part #'s 908B,908N, and 908X all for 1.25 eyepieces? I have found these and need clarification.
Thank You Both Again,
RickScofield

#5 MistrBadgr

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 02:32 PM

John, correct me if I am wrong. Seems like there were maybe three different 918 filters, maybe B, O, and X. I am a bit fuzzy, but I think the X was the narrowest band and B was the broadest.
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#6 RickScofield

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Posted 24 March 2015 - 06:00 PM

Mark and John,

These are the filters I have ordered:

 

MEADE ND96 Moon filter 1.25" Part# 07536 

MEADE Filter Set (#12/23A/58/80A) 1.25" Part# 07530

DGM Optics Galaxy Contrast Astronomy Filter - GCE™ 1.25"  

DGM Optics  Nebula Astronomy Filter-NPB 1.25"

 

Again Thank you both for your help and advice.

RickScofield

 

 



#7 MeadeGuy

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 08:39 AM

There were three Meade deep sky filters at one time, B, N and X. 

 

B for Broadband were the most generic and widespread. Good general use sky pollution filter. 

 

N for Narrowband was logically enough more restrictive/aggressive, blocking more light pollution but more light from the actual target as well. 

 

X was an OIII filter, specifically for targets visible in OIII. Great for those, not terribly useful elsewhere. 

 

John Piper

Customer Service Manager 

Meade Instruments Corp. 

 

 

 



#8 MistrBadgr

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 05:36 PM

Thanks, John.

I bought one of the B versions for my LS 8, but did not think to buy one of the ones made to thread onto eyepieces, when they were on clearance... My bad!

Bill
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#9 RickScofield

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Posted 28 March 2015 - 07:16 PM

Mark, John, and Bill,
I order a Meade 908B filter this is the version that threads onto a 1.25" eyepiece. I found a new one.
Thank you all again, Rick Scofield

#10 ButchA

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 06:15 AM

Speaking of filters...

 

I was looking at the moon a few nights ago with my old DS2114 reflector and the original, stock, MA9mm eyepiece.  Once I got the moon centered, I peered in the eyepiece and almost got blinded!  :-

 

Is a neutral density filter a good option or is a polarizing filter better?



#11 MistrBadgr

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Posted 12 April 2015 - 11:40 AM

Normally, a polarizing filter is actually two filters that can be rotated compared to each other and vary the amount of light transmitted. They can also help remove stray light or glare. A neutral density filter simply diminishes the overall amount of light by a fixed amount. Sometimes, there is a limit to the amount of space in the focuser and a polarizing filter cannot fit inside and still allow the eyepiece to fit where it is supposed to, which may affect the image, but may not. For your scope, if a filter increases the distance between the eyepiece and your booster lens in the focuser, the magnification will be increased also. Which one is better? It depends a lot on what you want to do and how much money you want to spend.

This is not a real yes or no answer, but I hope it helps.

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma




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