Jump to content


Photo

Thread information required


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Perthastro

Perthastro

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 30 May 2014 - 02:00 AM

Hi guys,

 

Living in a metric country (ie almost anywhere but the USA) brings major challenges with Meade gear as there are dozens of thread pitches in use in the USA and many are really hard to find in the metric parts of the planet.

 

The reason I need the thread information is that Meade in their infinite wisdom probably allowed the work experience kid from the local high school to design the counterweight bar and left no clearance underneath it to fit a dew heater strap. I don't particularly like flattening and damaging the insulation on my heater elements. So I have a friend machining up a couple of spacers to raise the bar to a 5mm clearance from the OTA. This means longer screws will be needed.

 

Does anyone know what the exact threat pitch and thread type is for the counterweight end stop cap screws and also the counterweight tube mounting  cap screws?

 

My local engineering fastening shop was defeated by them and couldn't match the threads.  This is unusual in that they carry a good range of Imperial and US fasteners.

 

Can any one please help?



#2 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2780 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 30 May 2014 - 04:54 PM

You might want to take whatever has the threads on it to your local hardware store and try out the various sized nuts that they have.  I do this often with all kinds of things.  If you are talking about the counterweight bar or whatever you were complaining about in your other post, you local machinist should be able to measure it and tell you.

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 Perthastro

Perthastro

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 31 May 2014 - 07:35 AM

@Bill.

 

Two major engineering fastening companies cannot match the threads. My machinist is 4000km from where my observing site is, that's roughly the same distance as LA to NY.

 

Thanks for your help it's really good to see an Admin who is helpful, literate and knows the product of the company he indirectly represents.



#4 Mark Sibole

Mark Sibole

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2368 posts

Posted 31 May 2014 - 08:26 AM

exactly which scope is this for and what part?


Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com

#5 Mark Sibole

Mark Sibole

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2368 posts

Posted 31 May 2014 - 08:27 AM

Meade as any other company uses mixed and matches sizes in metric and sae standards so knowing the exact scope and part you need will help a lot.


Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com

#6 Perthastro

Perthastro

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 31 May 2014 - 09:23 AM

exactly which scope is this for and what part?

Lx 600 12".Scope was manufactured last month.

 

The two sizes I can't get a match on are the cap screw used as end stops on the counterweight rail and the counterweight rail to OTA attachment capscrew which is a dome headed unit.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.



#7 RickScofield

RickScofield

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 281 posts
  • LocationBellevue,Nebraska

Posted 31 May 2014 - 09:27 PM

Maybe a picture or two would help here?

#8 Mark Sibole

Mark Sibole

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2368 posts

Posted 01 June 2014 - 06:25 AM

they used to be 1/4 20 threads but im not familiar with the 600 models.Ill drop meade an e mail and see if i can find out hwat they use now a days.


Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com

#9 Perthastro

Perthastro

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 June 2014 - 10:14 AM

they used to be 1/4 20 threads but im not familiar with the 600 models.Ill drop meade an e mail and see if i can find out hwat they use now a days.

 

It's all changed Mark, they are quite a fine pitch but nothing that two of the largest engineering supply companies can match here where I love and they have a pretty good range of non metric components.

 

Thanks for the help though it's very much appreciated.



#10 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2780 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 01 June 2014 - 01:41 PM

I would bet they are a metric size of some sort.  All of the recent things I have from Meade have been metric, including the threads on the end of the vertical shaft that the leg brace of my LS 8 gets tightened with.  It was a standard thread for a 10 mm nut, if I remember correctly.  That scope was made in the Tiajuana plant where the LX600 is made.

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#11 Perthastro

Perthastro

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 02 June 2014 - 03:18 AM

I would bet they are a metric size of some sort.  All of the recent things I have from Meade have been metric, including the threads on the end of the vertical shaft that the leg brace of my LS 8 gets tightened with.  It was a standard thread for a 10 mm nut, if I remember correctly.  That scope was made in the Tiajuana plant where the LX600 is made.

 

Bill Steen

 

They are not metric. I know that for a fact. I have a full range of metric gear here and they aren't any of the metric threads, wrong shaped thread profile (shape) for metric unless they are using a seriously weird pitch that is outside of the standard metric classes.

 

With 10mm it can have a ptich of 2.0mm, 1.5mm (coarse standard), 1.25mm (normal, fine) or 1mm for standard fasteners.  One of the benefits of the metric system is it's simplicity, no more having to deal with a dozen or more thread "standards" such as BSW, Acme, SAE, UNF, UTS and a dozen or so others.  Current international ISO standards for manufacturing use Metric for non pipe fittings and BSP for pipe fittings.

 

t.



#12 Mark Sibole

Mark Sibole

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2368 posts

Posted 02 June 2014 - 07:35 AM

well I have an e mail in to them to see if we can find out what threads they are for ya.


Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com

#13 Perthastro

Perthastro

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 03 June 2014 - 07:06 PM

well I have an e mail in to them to see if we can find out what threads they are for ya.

 

I'll be waiting for the answer. ::)



#14 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2780 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 04 June 2014 - 05:33 PM


 

@Bill.

 

Two major engineering fastening companies cannot match the threads. My machinist is 4000km from where my observing site is, that's roughly the same distance as LA to NY.

 

Thanks for your help it's really good to see an Admin who is helpful, literate and knows the product of the company he indirectly represents.

 

4000 km is quite a ways to your friendly neighborhood machinist.  To bad my Ace Hardware Store is farther away from you than your machinist. So far, (knock on wood or whatever you do for good luck) they have had what I needed in the way of thread finding every time.  There is a kid there from the local high school that is really good with things like that.

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#15 rparry

rparry

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 31 July 2014 - 02:37 PM

I live in a supposedly metric country, Canada, and I deal with thread issues all the time.

Most if not all the odd ball threads I deal with are metric.  The three most likes threads on the Meade

if they are indeed SAE are 1/4 x 20, #10 x 24 or #10 x 32.

 

Metric threads are a balls up mess.  The automotive industry is the worst as they ad-lib threads

all the time that are not available anywhere else.  The ISO "Standard" only specifies the profile,

nothing else.  The pitch of the thread is up to the manufacturer as is the hex size of the bolt.

European industrial companies have a reasonably common thread system, however this is not

worldwide and Asia is often different.

 

I feel your pain PerthAstro, I deal with this problem daily.  You most likely have an odd metric

thread that maybe common where the scope was manufactured.  You most likely can run a tap

that is near the right thread through the hole and use a screw that is common to you.  This will

not work for a heavy loaded fastener but should work for your case.  Use a low strength Loc-Tite

and you should be good to go.  Loc-Tite on small fasteners can be difficult to remove without a 

little heat so if this is to be removed often than skip Loc-Tite.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users