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2130 slewing question


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#1 sansouci01

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 01:00 PM

I have a 2130 go to scope. When I put a higher magnification eyepiece in, it doesn't stay centered in the eyepiece when tracking. The lower power eyepiece works perfectly. Can I change the slew speed when using higher power eyepieces so it tracks better or is there only one tracking speed?



#2 MistrBadgr

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 02:38 PM

There is a way to have a custom tracking speed, but generally that is for use with the Moon.  There is normally a little inacuracy that is not apparent at lower magnifications that can show up at higher levels.  

 

If the object you are looking at moves a lot at the very start, or if the scope seems to argue with you when you move the object into position and then the scope moves the object to another position, gear training may be off a little.  I think the gear training routines are in the setup menu.

 

When one of the DS mounts is really "on"  the object can still wander around in the field, but I have had them stay in the field at over 100X for over an hour.  The particular mount that really stayed with the object is one that I pulled apart and carefully sanded down all the gear surfaces, etc.  I do not really recomend that someone do that.  At 100X, I would expect the normal mount, with the gears accurately trained to keep an object in the field at 100X for 5 to 10 minutes.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Bill Steen 


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 sansouci01

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 04:46 PM

Thanks Bill.

Forgot about the training. It's not really that bad considering the cost of the scope...in my case...FREE. It's something I can live with. I might try to train the drives and see if that helps...



#4 MistrBadgr

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 05:28 PM

You are welcome.

 

You are right about the cost and what you get for it.  At my regular job, if we bought anything that had all the functionality of that little mount, it would cost several times that much.  They use different forms of plastic in the mount to save weight, cost, and wear.  They used to have metal gears in the original mount.  I have been told they wore out fairly soon.  The plastic they are using for gears looses a little of that true accuracy, they they will never wear out in one person's life time.  Something else might wear out, probably something metal, but not the gears.

 

Best Regards,

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#5 Mark Sibole

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 09:34 AM

as with any telescope more errors show up under high magnification.

Like Bill stated make sure you train and calibrate drives. Also make sure you get a good polar alignment.

Every little thing helps in the end.

Regards

 

Mark


Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com

#6 MistrBadgr

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 01:46 PM

Mark's note just reminded me of something I did not say.

 

I really do not know if this has any significant impact on how well the mount tracks, but there is a possibility that it does, so I do this with my DS-2000 mounts:  From my back yard, I always put the scope in the same spot.  I then adjust the leg length if needed to level the mount.  I use a little round bubble level that I place on the flat portion of the mount.  I have a reference point I use on my house that lines up with Polaris and I point the scope exactly at that.  I then take my bubble level, place it on the telescope tube and adjust the level of the scope itself.

 

I figure that if I do all that, the scope is starting out with exactly the same reference point each time.  Whatever the calculations are inside the scope, having the same starting point should level out the variations that the scope tries to control over time.  What I hope is the swings that can take place in the iterations when the internal computer does its thing should be smaller and the final position the scope finds will be more accurate.

 

Then, when I am using the scope and I find an object, when I am through looking at it, I center the object in the field.  I then press the enter button and hold it for a couple of seconds, release the button, the scope beeps at me to tell me it knows the spot, I hit the enter button again and that locks in the position of that object and uses that in the calculations.  After two or three of those, the scope will normally slew to a new object and it will be in the field of view.

 

I hope this makes sense.

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#7 sansouci01

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 03:53 PM

Thanks for all the info. I made a pier made out of 2" steel pipe. A 12" piece of pipe is concreted in the ground with a coupler on the top. I just screw the pier into the pipe and line it up to north. Looking across my pond is north so no problem finding polaris.scope pier.jpg



#8 MistrBadgr

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 04:15 AM

That is a great rig and a very nice setting for it!

 

I have a long tube 2130 myself and think it is a wonderful learning scope and really good enough for a lifetime of enjoyment.

 

I am currently working on a new mirror for mine, made from fused quartz, to get that last little bit out of it.

 

I am also taking all the parts from another one I have, getting a new, longer tube rolled at a fab shop, and making a 1500 mm fused quartz mirror for it.  That one will mostly be my Moon scope.  Very high magnifications (up to 375 with a 4 mm Orthoscopic eyepiece) and no Barlow.

 

Best Regards,

 

Bill Steen


Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma




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