Jump to content


Photo

autoguiding vs tracking


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 rajiv sapre

rajiv sapre

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 11 October 2013 - 04:41 AM

Hi, I'm new to the forum.
I have a basic question regarding autoguiding...
I have a 8" celestron sct and a mead deep sky imager.
The imager allows you to track an object on the screen by placing a centroid on any bright object on the screen.
Is this level of tracking enough for photographing galaxys ?
Why is separate autoguiding necessary when the deep sky imager is tracking the object as it is photographing?
Thanks in advance.
Rajiv

#2 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2958 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 21 October 2013 - 12:24 PM

Hi Rajiv,

Welcome to the Meade 4M Community Forum! I do not know enough about imaging to answer your question with any certainty, but I just now saw your post and thought it deserved a reply of some sort. Normally new posts are highlighted on my screen, but the first time I was breezing by could have been when your post had a piece of spam hooked onto it that I was removing and I did not actually read what you wrote.

Just thinking about it, I suspect that the guiding that you can do with the deep sky imager is probably good enough for some levels of imaging. If imaging with a single camera for both taking the image and for guiding must work reasonably well, or I do not think it would be sold set up to do that. However, if you get into imaging deeply, it may be that having the separate guide camera gives you something better.

I have seen any number of rigs with two cameras on them that were both very expensive by my standards. The people using them were really into imaging and did not have a casual interest. They obviously believed they needed both to get the quality of images they wanted, which was world class by really anyone's standards. Those people had well beyond $50,000 invested in their equipment.

What you might want to do is try out the one camera method and see what happens. Work with it enough to know that you are exhausting the potential of your equipment. If that is not enough, then save up your money and invest in the more expensive equipment.

Hope this helps,

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 gspie

gspie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 314 posts
  • LocationScottsdale, Arizona

Posted 21 October 2013 - 01:50 PM

The difference is small, but very large for imaging. A scope that tracks an object, using the mount alone, is really good for visual astronomy -- it really doesn't matter if the scope drifts slightly due to an imperfect alignment or sloppy gears. Guiding, using a CCD to capture a star, monitor the centroid, and send signals to the mount to keep the centroid in one place is necessary for long-integration astrophotography. So, you really don't need the accuracy of the DSI tracking for visual stuff, however, if you want to do astrophotography, it is an absolute requirement to be able to guide for log exposures.
LX850 with 10" ACF OTA and Takahashi FS 60C OTA -- SBIG STT-8300M CCD with FW8G-STT Self Guiding Filter Wheel and SBIG AO-8 Adaptive Optics -- Camera Control and Image Calibration with Maxim DL/CCD Pro, Image processing with PixInsight, and final composition with Photoshop CS5

http://home.comcast....ie/astroweb.htm

#4 rajiv sapre

rajiv sapre

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:13 PM

Thanks guys,

I have been using the Autostar suit to photograph plants. With the centroid, the camera stacks up all the exposures to get a good composite image with out autoguiding as the exposure times are quite small. Now I want to try photographs of galaxys... My problem is that my Mead CCD does not talk to my Celestron telescope! Ive downloaded ASCOM drives, but it doesnt work. I think the cable may be wrong......So thats why I was thinking of just using the centroid to stack images without autoguiding!

Anyway, thanks for the input.. I will see what is the best resuts I can get....

Rajiv

#5 gspie

gspie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 314 posts
  • LocationScottsdale, Arizona

Posted 26 October 2013 - 07:39 AM

There are other programs that may work for you (they use ASCOM drivers that work with most equipment). Maxim/DL is an excellent program for guiding with different equipment, and has many image processing features, but can be pricey. I'm sure someone knows of other products.
LX850 with 10" ACF OTA and Takahashi FS 60C OTA -- SBIG STT-8300M CCD with FW8G-STT Self Guiding Filter Wheel and SBIG AO-8 Adaptive Optics -- Camera Control and Image Calibration with Maxim DL/CCD Pro, Image processing with PixInsight, and final composition with Photoshop CS5

http://home.comcast....ie/astroweb.htm

#6 rajiv sapre

rajiv sapre

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 29 October 2013 - 11:28 PM

Thanks, Gspie, ill try other software too.

Rajiv




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users