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DS 2130 Focuser


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#1 sgriffith62

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 06:52 AM

I am very new to astronomy and telescopes. I have a DS 2130 telescope I just purchased used.
This uses a .965 focuser. I found a Meade 1.25 focuser that came off another Meade Reflector.
Before I purchase it, will it fit on the OTA?
Thanks

#2 MistrBadgr

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 07:43 AM

I cannot tell you absolutely for sure. But, if it is for the same diameter of scope, it should. There could be a slight difference between a focuser for a DS 2114 and a DS 2130, but different focusers for a DS 2130 should work just fine.

The only complication that I can think of is if the bolt holes were cast in different places, but I do not think that likely.

Another possibility is to check and see if you can simply unscrew the eyepiece holder off of the focuser and get a different one for 1.25 inch eyepieces.

There are several different sellers on eBay that may have them. Telescope-Warehouse is one. The owner, Bill Vorce, goes by scopehed1. Another, Emily, goes by the handle, lipstickonapig. I do not remember the name of the store, but she provides good service as well.

Hope this helps,

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 sgriffith62

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 02:49 AM

THanks Bill. Contacted Bill Vorce and have one coming.

#4 sgriffith62

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 06:54 PM

Got the top 1.25 for my focuser and works well.
Also, ordered a laser collimator from Orion. DOes the mirror on the DS-2130 have the center primary marked for the secondary?
The instructions with the Orion collimator says to remove the primary, trace it on paper then fold the paper into quarters and cut 1/3 inch in the center corner, then put their target
on this mirror. Any suggestions?

#5 MistrBadgr

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 08:33 PM

The 2130 does not have the center of the primary mirror marked, unless a previous owner marked it. I do that on my mirrors except that I cut a smaller hole in the middle than that and use a cone point Sharpie.

Just set the mirror face down on a piece of typing paper, draw a circle around it, cut it out, fold it into forths, cut the tip off, unfold it, set it on top if the mirror and get it as centered as you can, then carefully put a mark or some other object if it is supplied.

There have been times that I ironned the paper circle flat after cutting the hole.

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#6 sgriffith62

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 06:27 AM

Thanks, I will do that.
Is there a way I can clean the mirror when I get it out?

#7 MistrBadgr

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 07:27 AM

The biggest issue with cleaning mirrors is damaging the coating. You have to watch out for that.

The first thing I normally do is to try to blow off what I can with some of the stuff you can use to blow out your computer. Just make sure you hold the can vertically, You do not want to get any of the liquid on the mirror or you will have a time getting the film off.

Get a roll of Viva paper towels, the softest ones out there as far as I know. Also, get some demineralized water, like someone would use in a clothes iron. A small plastic tube is good to use.

Put mildly warm water in the tub and put in a drop or two of a simple dishwashing liquid, like Joy. You do not want a liquid with any oils in it. Then, fold up some pieces of the paper towel to make cleaning pads with four to eight layers of material. You will need several of these.

The next step for me is to try to simply rinse off the surface in tap water, but do not do any swabbing on the surface yet.

Then, stick the mirror in the tub of water, let it stand for a few minutes, five is more than enough. Take one of the pads you made and very gently stroke across the mirror down in the water with a soggy pad. I normally make one sweep, turn the pad over, make another sweep with the other side, throw the pad away. Get another pad and do the same with it, until the whole surface has been swept.

Take the mirror out of the tub, rinse it off in tap water with no solid contact of the reflecting surface, just water flowing on it. Then, hold the mirror at an angle, pour some of the distilled water over the surface until the whole surface has been rinsed with the pure water.

Most of the water will have run off, leaving a dry surface, but there will be some small water drops. Take a piece of clean paper towel and carefully touch the water droplets with it. The water will be drawn up into the paper towel.

Inspect the mirror for cleanliness. No mater how hard I try, there will normally be a tiny spot or two that I can see. You can try the process again and see of they come off. But, a small spot or two will not hurt anything and you may want to just leave it alone. A tiny spot is a whole lot better than a scratch in the surface, which is what you risk every time you clean a mirror.

The best thing to do is keep the open end of the telescope covered and the focuser end plugged when the telescope is not in use. Most people I know do not clean their mirrors more than about once each year.

There are other ways to clean a mirror. This particular one is simple enough for me and what I am comfortable doing.

If you mess up the coating, you are talking about $50-$60 or so to get it recoated, including shipping.

Let me know if this is confusing and I will try again.

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#8 sgriffith62

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 08:41 PM

Pretty straight forward thanks

#9 sgriffith62

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 10:43 AM

Took the mirror out. Needs to be re-coated. looks like someone tried to clean it with a brillo pad,
lots of swirl scratches on it and looks like a couple of spots where the coating has come off. . Also, I decided to measure the mirror. The description says it is a 130mm
mirror, but my digital calipers measures it at 127 mm. wonder if this is the original mirror...
Know where I can get this re-coated or buy a new one? Not sure if I can buy one from Meade. the focal length is 1020mm.

#10 MistrBadgr

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 02:13 PM

Yes, the original mirror is 127 mm. The name is just DS 2130. Don't know why.

There are several people out there that can recoat. The one I have used satisfactorily for small mirrors is Hans Wiest at www.1800destiny.com.

That is also his phone number for his astronomy business, which is more of a labor of love for him. I think his full time business is destiny computers.

On-line, he has prices for the different sizes, but I do not remember what a five inch mirror runs. He does a standard aluminum coating with about 90% reflectance, then gives it a silicon dioxide overcoat for protection.

I think there are others that advertise on www.cloudynights.com.

Another one I think I am remembering correctly is Spectrum Coatings. They also do a couple of other more exotic coatings with up to 98% reflectance, but at a higher price.

Some of the more "major" companies start working at 6 inches, or at least they did when I was checking around a few years ago. They did not answer my emails about a 4.5 inch mirror, but they may have changed their minds by now.

Hope this helps,

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#11 sgriffith62

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 03:43 PM

Sent the mirror to Paul at Spectrum coatings. Hope to have it back soon. He is going
to put a center mark on it for me do I can collimate it.

#12 sgriffith62

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 10:06 PM

Got my mirror back and a great job. Paul put a center mark on it and has 92% reflective. Installed the mirror in the cell and I think I got the secondary collimated but having lots of trouble with the primary.
Need to watch a few more videos

#13 MistrBadgr

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 04:31 PM

That is good feedback on Spectrum.

One thing I do for the primary is to back away from it a bit, look with one eye from a spot where the secondary mirror lies directly on top of its reflection, then look to see where it sits in the mirror. If it is centered and all the spider legs are on top of their reflections, then you should be good to go.

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma




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