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#1 johnvenditti

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 08:47 AM

Newbie here, I have a Meade ETX 80 and i can see Jupiter and 4 of its moons pretty well ( or at least I thought so until I saw some of your Pictures ).  However, Jupiter looks just about plain white.  Should I be using some sort of filters for viewing Jupiter and other planets?  Are there specific color filters for each planet?

thanks

john

#2 Guest_rtanton_*

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 06:13 PM

Hi John,

Color filters can help your eyes distinguish features a bit better on the planets (Jupiter, Saturn and Mars) by enhancing contrast between various colors. 

#80A Medium Blue Planetary Filter: Enhances details in Jupiter’s belts and Red Spot, high clouds and polar caps on Mars, lunar surface details, Venus cloud features 
#25 Red Planetary Filter: Enhances Martian surface details in large scopes, reveals cloud definition on Venus, accentuates bluish cloud regions on Jupiter and Saturn
#58 Green Planetary Filter: Enhances contrast of blue and red structures on Jupiter (including Red Spot), melt lines around Martian polar ice caps, accentuates Saturn’s cloud belts
#15 Deep Yellow Planetary Filter: Boosts contrast of lunar features, accentuates red and orange features on Saturn, Jupiter, and Mars, reveals low-contrast cloud detail on Venus


Do not, however, expect your eyes to perform like a camera.  Your eyes can only process 1/16 second exposures, cannot stack images, and has most of its color receptors (cones) shut down at night - put cameras under the same limitations and their images would not be quite as spectacular.


Russ

#3 johnvenditti

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 02:41 AM

Thanks again Russ, I am excited to see whats out there.  My first night I saw Saturn and its rings, very small but very clear and visible.  I also saw Jupiter like I said, but it was a slightly larger white disc, and 4 of its moons.

john

#4 johnvenditti

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 02:46 AM

Russ, do you know where I could purchase these color lenses for the ETX 80?

john

#5 Brent

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 10:04 PM

Hey John, just a heads up on the filter purchase. I have a 80mm refractor and can n a good night see some slight asmospheric coloratiion, like blury bands of brown with a 6.4 supper plossl. Jupiter and 4 moons just fits in the field of view at times. I bought the color filters hoping to get more detail and what happens is : when I view Jupiter with the blue filter it trns Jupiter blue, with the red filter it turns Jupiter red and so on. In other words I haven't noticed any more detail in anything, maybe with a large aperature scope it helps but I don't even bother with them anymore. In retrospect I think my money would have been better spent on a narrow band filter. In short, don't get your hopes up about what these color filters are going to do for you on a small aperature scope. Been there done that. Take care,  Brent

#6 Guest_rtanton_*

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 09:35 PM

Hi John,

Colored filters are available from almost any telescope shop or online, but I agree with Brent and have not been impressed by their benefits...although I know some planetary specialists swear by them.  You might try a cheap experiment with colored transparency sheet to see if they work for you before plunking down for a real set.

Russ

#7 DoninMd

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 11:06 AM

Bragging grandpa here.  Can't resist.
But first, happy to say all of my old photography filters also work.  Just lay them on top of the lens and handle all carefully.

You guys are all missing Jupiter's 5th moon!  My 6 year old granddaughter, who told me that Saturn's rings are made up of ice, dust and newspapers (she heard particles in school which she translated to articles and the rest is brag time), looked through the DS2114 and she said she saw FIVE moons with Jupiter.  Now who am I to argue??  I think we have a budding astronomer here.

Cheers,
DoninMd




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