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Meade XWA EXtreme Wide Angle (2") 100°

series 5000

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#1 franciscosjb

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 01:05 PM

Hello,

Im a newbie into Observing through Telescopes, I recently got myself an LS 6"

and I want to get a really fine eyepiece

Anyone knows how good this new line are?

MEADE SERIES 5000 XTREME WIDE ANGLE line

Im thinking of the 9mm eyepiece

how good and big would planets and nebulas look on a Meade ETX LS 6" ACF would look with this eyepiece?

how about the other eyepieces from this same line?

http://www.shopatron...25.1019303.0.0?


MEADE SERIES 5000 XTREME WIDE ANGLE 20MM EYEPIECE

MEADE SERIES 5000 XTREME WIDE ANGLE 14MM EYEPIECE

MEADE SERIES 5000 XTREME WIDE ANGLE 9MM EYEPIECE

Thanks!
Current Scope / Meade ETX LS 6" ACF /

My God, It`s Full of Stars!!

#2 MistrBadgr

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 05:58 PM

Hi Francisco,

Generally, wide angle eyepieces are better for wide field views, rather than for planets. In eyepieces, like many other things, in order to get one characteristic to work at an extreme, you have to give up on some other characteristic.

The really wide eyepieces can give you a feeling that you are actually out in space looking around, but they tend to give up characteristics that make them good for planetary observing.

i have use othoscopic eyepieces, which Meade currently does not sell. They are a long standing version that can give very good views at the expense of a narrower apparent field of view, around 45 degrees. The regular four element plossles are more general viewing eyepieces that can serve reasonably well for planetary use, but are not as good as orthoscopic eyepieces or others. A longer focal length plosslewith a barlow does almost as well as an orthoscopic.

I have been told that TMB Monocentrics are about the best planetary eyepieces, but they are not made any more, and are very expensive when you do find one that someone is interested in selling.

I have compared the 5000 series plossles, TMB Planetaries (different than Monocentrics), University Optics HD Orthoscopics, and Televue Plossles with my LS-8, looking at Jupiter. I really could tell very little real difference in the images. What differences I could see that would make one better than the other would depend more on the taste of the observer rather than real differences between the eyepieces.

There are other brands and designs of planetary eyepieces out there and every planetary observer will have his favorites.

Of the ones I have, the fully multicoated orthoscopics work the best for me when there are adverse conditions or intense light, such as Jupiter. I think the TMB planetaries are very good for viewing less briliant objects. With six pieces of glass instead of the four in the orthos, there is more chance of reflections. the TMB planetaries have a 60 degree field of view, however. The five element 5000 series plossles are still in the running, however, and I use them normally first and then switch to the orthos if I am not satisfied with what I see with the 5000 series.

I am very curious about the 6000 series eyepieces and may eventually purchase one, just to try it out.

There are any number of astronomers that I have talked to that believe that Teleview Radians are the best planetaries around and others dispute that claim. I know they are very good or people would not pay the price they cost. I think it depends a lot on the observer's eyes. The Radian eyepiece has a 60 degree field of view, if I remember correctly.

As far as the ultra wide angle eyepieces go, they are very good for giving you a wide angle view of galaxies, nebula, and other such things that are normally rather dim. I do not believe you would be satisfied with them for planetary viewing. It is not what they were made for. Even the 9.7mm 4000 series plossl might be better for that service.

Eyepieces are more like the tools in a tool belt. Different ones are made for different uses. The ultra wide angle eyepiece you mentioned is a great eyepiece.....just not for planetary viewing.

Well, hope this helps!

Bill Steen
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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 franciscosjb

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 12:47 AM

Bill thank you so much for your explanation, now I have a better understanding of how things work with eyepieces.

Based on your recommendations I think I might go with the:

Series 5000 HD-60 6 Element Eyepieces Set
[ME07736]

Combined with a:

Tele-Xtender 5000 2x (2") with 1.25" adapter
[ME07672]


This should give me variety for planetary observing with my LS 6" right?

What do you think of this combination?

I really appreciate your help in this matter!

Francisco
Current Scope / Meade ETX LS 6" ACF /

My God, It`s Full of Stars!!

#4 MistrBadgr

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 08:03 AM

I have not used any of the HD-60 eyepieces myself, so I cannot answer firmly.

However, from what I can read about them, the views should be very good with just about anything.

The only time I can think of that would give you difficulty is when you are looking at something very bright and it is a little hazy outside. The view will not be top notch with any eyepiece. I think in those times, having surfaces from six different elements might be a negative factor.

Varying conditions is why a lot of planetary observers have several different sets of eyepieces. They will change from one design to another just to get that tiny little bit of extra. Most times, I think they and I may be straining at gnats. I do not think you would be going wrong at all with a set of the HD-60 eyepieces. I think they will work very well in just about any application.

The HD-60 eyepieces are the latest design that Meade has put out and should be the latest technology based on the newest understanding on how all these things work to make the best eyepiece.

I am very happy with my 5000 series plossles and believe the HD 6000 series should be better. If they were not, Meade would have no reason to sell them.

Best Regards,

Bill Steen
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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#5 MistrBadgr

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 11:52 AM

I do not think you will need a barlow with the HD-60 eyepieces and your f/10 telescope.

I think the short focal length ones, 4.5 and 6.5 mm, are basically longer focal length plossles with almost a custom built-in barlow lens. If you get the whole set, you might try them out first before getting a barlow.

The 6.5mm eyepiece will be about as far as you will normally ever go in terms of magnification. The 4.5mm will be good only with the best atmospheric conditions and at high elevation. If the short focal length eyepieces work well, there is no need for a barlow. If the quality of the image falls off, then a 9mm eyepiece with a 2X barlow should work well to replace the 4.5, but you may not need it if you are not at a high elevation (above 2000 feet above sea level)

A little correction, the HD-60 eyepieces are still 5000 series, not 6000. Meade, in their description, still seems to be referring to them as plossles, even though true plossles have only four elements. The HD-60 eyepieces are apparently a derivative of plossles.

Bill Steen
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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#6 franciscosjb

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Posted 07 September 2012 - 01:20 PM

thanks again Bill,

I think Ill go or that Set of HD-60 Eyepieces and wait to see how things go before getting the Tele-Xtender 2X 2" with 1.25 adapter

I live in Mexico City so we have a lot of altitude over here, this city is at 2,240 metres (7,350 ft) above sea level.

Lets see how things go
thanks again for your precious help!, you really got me a better understanding with eyepieces.

cheers!
Francisco
Current Scope / Meade ETX LS 6" ACF /

My God, It`s Full of Stars!!

#7 MistrBadgr

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 08:46 AM

Francisco,

I envy you your elevation! Where I live is about 660 feet above sea level. I hope sometime to go to the Okietex Star Party that is near Black Mesa in the far western tip of Oklahoma at about 4000 feet.

Looking at the set of HD-60 eyepieces, at that price you are essentially getting one eyepiece free, plus a free carrying case, compared to the price of buying all six eyepieces separately. Eventually, I think I will have to get a set of those, but that will have to wait until I get a little observatory built in my back yard.

They have spaced the focal lengths differently than with the 4000 series. You will pretty much drop focal length in half by going every other one, which is what seems to work with the wider apparent field of view (AFOV) and with a little experience. You can drop to the focal length you need for planetary viewing very easily that way. If you have trouble loosing the object with that big of a jump, at first, you can go back to dropping one eyepiece size at a time. With the 4000 series, the same two eyepiece drop is 60%, which is good for the 52 degree AFOV of those eyepieces.

I normally take a 4000 series set with me when I travel by car as part of my job. I normally have been taking a 79 to 90 mm refractor along and have recently bought an optical tube that normally goes on a DS-2101 for that purpose. I use my 5000 series plossles with my LS-8 at home.

I think the the HD-60s will be a good fit with the quality of the optics in your telescope.

Best Regards,

Bill Steen
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Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#8 franciscosjb

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 06:49 AM

thanks Bill, I´ll let you know how it goes as soon as the eyepieces get here!

cheers!
Current Scope / Meade ETX LS 6" ACF /

My God, It`s Full of Stars!!





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