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LPI & PST?


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#1 vomit

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 07:47 PM

Has anyone used the Meade LPI with there PST? I am interested in taking some shots during the transit but would like to know what I can expect, what settings to use & so forth?

Any info. is appreciated.

#2 JohnGraham

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 07:53 AM

I've done a fair amount of imaging with an LPI on my PST, though it has been a while (I now use a DMK21). You'll want to experiment a bit, but here's what I remember. The simplest method is to operate the camera in monochrome mode, however, if you set the exposure so you can see the proms, the disk is over exposed, if you set the exposure so that the disk isn't over exposed, the proms are faint. The fix is to run the camera in color mode, set the exposure so that the proms are visible and the disk is over exposed, and save your images as FITS. This last step is the important one. When you save the images as FITS Envisage saves each color in its own file. You'll find that the proms show up great in the red data, the disk looks great in the green, and the blue will be under exposed. Sooooo, if you get your settings right your can image the disk and the proms at the same time.

Good luck!

-John

#3 Philip Pugh

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 09:37 AM

I am still struggling for focus with a webcam and PST, although I have been getting results with the Moon, Saturn and Venus. I'd use a digital camera as backup. The worst thing is to get nmo images at all, so for special events I recommend you stick with the tried and trusted.

Now if you get a chance to practice with the LPI before June 6th, all well and good but I'm clouded out here at the moment.

#4 JohnGraham

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 01:03 PM

Another trick is to wrap the LPI with foil to hlp keep it cool and to prevent sunlight from leaking through the plastic case.

#5 vomit

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 06:42 PM

I've done a fair amount of imaging with an LPI on my PST, though it has been a while (I now use a DMK21). You'll want to experiment a bit, but here's what I remember. The simplest method is to operate the camera in monochrome mode, however, if you set the exposure so you can see the proms, the disk is over exposed, if you set the exposure so that the disk isn't over exposed, the proms are faint. The fix is to run the camera in color mode, set the exposure so that the proms are visible and the disk is over exposed, and save your images as FITS. This last step is the important one. When you save the images as FITS Envisage saves each color in its own file. You'll find that the proms show up great in the red data, the disk looks great in the green, and the blue will be under exposed. Sooooo, if you get your settings right your can image the disk and the proms at the same time.

Good luck!

-John


Sounds technical. Maybe beyond my expertise.

#6 Mark Sibole

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 05:18 AM

I have not tried an LPI on the PST as I use the DSI Pro minus the filter bar.
I cant see any reason why the LPI wouldnt focus.
The PST has very limited in travel so you may need to play with the setup pre transit to be sure you can focus..
As for image capture if you shoot a one shot color imager your better off using it in mono .
As when you process out a Solar image you throw away the red and blue channels and all of the info is in the green channel.
Always set exposure time to get the disk details.Dont over expose the disk to get the proms.
Set exposure to get disk details using suto contrast then back down the contrast a bit.Shoot in either fits 3p if using a OSC normal operation. or tiff normal mode. Select dark spot tracking so you can auto stack on a sun spot.The proms then can be brought out in post processing.This is how 99% of solar imagers do it.
Here is a result of this method.
Posted Image
Mark Sibole
MTSO Observatory
Fife Lake, Mi.

http://astronomy.qteaser.com




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