Jump to content


Photo

DS repair site


  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#1 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 18 June 2010 - 10:00 AM

Is there someplace (website) that I can go to look into repair ,adjustments ,or general maintenance of my DSX-90?
Jeff

#2 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 19 June 2010 - 08:22 AM

Which DS mount do you have?

If both sides of the arm are black, it is most likely the DS-2000 like I have.

I have posted in this section several articles on pulling one apart and fixing the most likely problems.

I now have a generation 2 mount, with one side of the arm being a silvery gray.

I have taken that one apart for a cursory inspection and am now testing it to see how it behaves.

If you have any specific questions about either one, if I cannot answer it, I can dig into a mount and find out.

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#3 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 19 June 2010 - 10:49 PM

Hey Bill,
Both sides are black and I just did a search and didn't find a match.
I just need to find out if there are any adjustments for the verticle axis , as mine seems to be loose with some (flop).
It's not very bad right now, but I would like to try to fix it before it gets worse.
Please point me in the right direction if you can.
Thanks,
  Jeff
Jeff

#4 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 20 June 2010 - 07:21 PM

If the tightening nut starts widening out, it can hang up on the slots its three legs have to go through.  You will think you are tightening things up when it is not really that tight.  Take off the clamshell that holds the scope.  inside, you will see a keeper nut on the threads.  Unscrew that and what I call the three legged foot stool or tightening nut is underneath.  You will see where its three legs go through metal slots in the main shaft.  If I remember correctly, with the keeper nut off the end, you can unscrew the knob on the other side to unscrew the threaded bolt that goes through the tightening nut.  Pull the tightening nut in and out and see if it hangs at all and look at it for signs along the four sides of each foot.  If in doubt, use a fine tooth file and hone the sides smooth.  Do not take off too much or it can increase the slop by making clearances too big.

Under the tightening knob that you just removed, there should be a nut that is keeping the main shaft in place.  If that nut is working its way loose, the main shaft could be moving outward toward the telescope.  This could pull the main bull gear away from the mating worm gear and give you some slop.  All of the shaft and nut materials seem to be fairly soft aluminum, so take it easy.  The nut should be snug, but not really tight.  You can work it back and forth some with your hand turning the big end of the shaft on the telescope side.  Try a position on the nut and move the shaft back and forth.  If you get it too tight, you will feel things getting a little more difficult to move.  Back off from that position some until things loosten back up a little.

Try that.  If you still have a problem, let me know and I will dig further.  I am away from home and working just off the top of my head.  I will be back home and can do more digging on Wednesday evening.
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#5 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 21 June 2010 - 08:54 AM

I went inside the scope and cleaned it up,not much to find though,checked for tightness, then lubed it with a little pertroluem jelly, when I put it all back together I checked for the tightness with the oval nut by tightening it up to where it wouldn't move then backing it off until it moved freely.
The hardest part was trying to line up the (0) and the (90) with the pointer. I haven't gotten back outside to see if it helped yet, but maybe tonight I can.
I thank you for your assistance with this problem.
  Jeff
Jeff

#6 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 21 June 2010 - 01:28 PM

Jeff,

You are very welcome.  When I get some real time, I will try to look up the posts.  If I can find them, I will post a response to them to bring them to the front again.

Bill
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#7 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 21 June 2010 - 04:43 PM

Jeff,

I had a number of posts when I was talking about going into DS generation 1 mounts.  Those posts are currently on pages 10 and 11 of this DS section.  The time frame was something like June through September, 2007.  Look on those pages or look for post dates in that time frame and you will see them.

Bill
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#8 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 21 June 2010 - 09:04 PM

I'll be looking at them very soon.
Thanks Bill.
  Jeff
Jeff

#9 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 24 June 2010 - 12:56 PM

OK,
I finally got outside last night, leveled tube, pointed it north, and did an alignment. It showed that alignment was successful, but when I went through some basic movements, (Moon, Venus, Saturn) they weren't anywhere near my eyepiece, usually down and to the left.
When I would center them in the eyepiece, I would get a "back movement" off to one side usually to the right. After a lot of contemplation, I went and just moved the tube by hand and, centered  up on a star.
After slewing to a few more stars, it seemed to work for a while.
Any clues as what be the problem might be?
DSX-90AT-TC
497 handbox
??? 
Jeff

#10 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 24 June 2010 - 03:49 PM

If you are getting back movement when you use your arrow keys, it means that the drives need to be trained.  The mount is trying take up slack to put you in position to follow that spot in the sky.  If it thinks there is more slack in the gears than there really is the scope will move like you said.  If it thinks there is less slack than there is, it will move part of the way and then the object will move in your field of view for a while until the slack is taken up.

I have found the magic number of training attempts to be three.  Normally, if I go through the whole process three times, I stand a good chance of getting it right.

Hope this helps,

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#11 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 24 June 2010 - 10:41 PM

I will put my scope into an obedience class very soon (maybe I'll try Petsmarts).
The training will start tomorrow and we'll see how that works.
Again I appreciate all the help.
Thanks,
  Jeff
Jeff

#12 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 06 July 2010 - 08:36 PM

Finally made it out last night to check my alignment after training the the drives.
It seamed to work better,just outside the eyepiece,but will come in, within one or two rounds of the spiral search.
When I center, using the handbox, I still get a little "back movement", when I move to the left, it jumps back to the right, so I over move it and it moves back to around center.
All in all I can probably live with it, or try some more training of the drives.
I did get a chance to see some impressive "M" objects, until the sprinkler system came on  and I had to packup.
Clear Skies to all,
  Jeff 
Jeff

#13 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 06 July 2010 - 09:42 PM

Jeff,

There is a modified version of the programming for the 497 handset that Richard Seymour,
autostaretx," has on another website.  He modified it for me to allow me to use the 1 key to turn tracking on and off for seeing which way stars go to find out where west is with double stars.  While I was looking through the various modifications that can be turned on and off in the routine he sent me, I saw one that changed something to allow you to edit the constants that are stored in the handset for gear training.  This allows you to fiddle with the constants until they come in just right.  Then, you do not have to fight with the drive for placement of an object.  If you want, I can see if I can find that routine on my desk top machine and send it to you.  If not, I can look for the website where the routine can be downloaded.  You can look through the various routines, turn on or off the ones he has set up, and then let it build the code that you download into your 497 handset.

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#14 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 07 July 2010 - 06:34 AM

Hey Bill,
I'll take both methods if that won't be a problem, so I can take a look at what other people have to offer.
Thanks,
  jeff
Jeff

#15 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 08 July 2010 - 06:36 PM

The website where the 497 patches are on is www.weasner.com/ext/.

Work you way through until you get to a listing of 497 patches.

I am a bit confused about downloading something from there.

Mr Seymour has someone else working with him on improvements.  If you hit a link to the newest patch, or really any of them, you get a company selling some kind of software.  You can use the software for maybe 40 days as an introduction and then you have to buy a license for maybe $19 for a private household.  I think this is the software that unzips the archived file, but I am not sure.

Bill Steen
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#16 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 14 July 2010 - 09:53 PM

Hey Bill,
Can you send me that website again?
Somehow I managed to delete it with the rest of my other e-mails.
Thanks,
  Jeff
Jeff

#17 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 15 July 2010 - 02:05 PM

Jeff,

www.weasner.com/ext/menu.html

or Google Mike Weasner's Mighty EXT website.

Bill
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

#18 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 16 July 2010 - 02:59 PM

Thanks Bill, Now maybe I won't lose it. :)
Jeff

#19 PapaJ

PapaJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 02 September 2010 - 09:20 PM

>:( OK Bill,
It's gotten worse when I slew in the horizontal, while trying to center,or, just trying to find a star / object, I get vertical movement so bad that I've lost the object that I was looking at / for.
My horizontal movement takes some time to start moving, after the motor has already been in motion.
This is really frustrating, Please tell me that this is something that is easy to remedy.
Jeff

#20 MistrBadgr

MistrBadgr

    Advanced Member

  • Administrators
  • 2765 posts
  • LocationBroken Arrow, Oklahoma

Posted 03 September 2010 - 03:27 PM

Hi Jeff!

The most likely thing that has happened is that the azimuth (horizontal) gear train has slipped off its trust post somehow, or the thrust post itself has moved.  Hopefully, the thrust post has not moved.

You will need to pull the bottom bell off and look.  You will see the metal thrust post to one side of the gear train.  When the gears turn, the worm gear will thrust agains the big bull gear with the reactionary force trying to move the gear train rather than the whole mount and telescope.  The thrust post is the stop that keeps the gear train from moving.  One of the shafts butts onto a little flat spot on the post.  If it has shifted outward enough, the shaft will go too far and pop out of position.

If the post itself has shifted, most likely it will have tried to turn some as well as shift, you have to put it back in place and really tighten the screw.  If you push the post up against the gear train too hard, then tighten, the motor will bog down.  If it is too loose, there will be more slop in horizontal movement when the mount tries to turn.  Getting it in place with the right pressure is hard to explain.  It is more of a feel than anything else.

You also must keep in mind that the whole thing is made of either aluminum or some kind of pot metal and you can strip threads out of the casting.  It may take you several tries to get it right.  Just be patient and keep working with it. 

I have considered trying to put some glue under the base of the thrust post to help keep it in place.  However, once I tget one working, I am normally reluctant to fool with it any more.  If it is not working well and I need to fool with it, I am afraid of glueing it in the wrong spot.

They have fixed this in the generation 2 mounts by putting a lip of metal on the thrust post to keep it in the roght position.

Hope this helps.  If you get in there and everything seems to be OK, I will need to do a little head scratching and maybe ask you some silly questions.

Bill
Bill Steen, Sky Hunters' Haven Observatory, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users