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#1 bugzilla

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Posted 23 July 2008 - 05:43 AM

Hello all!  I just found an older model meade telescope at a thrift store for $35.  It is a Polaris, model #60EQ-D, D=60mm F=900mm, coated optics with an H25mm eyepiece.  It came with a decent stand, and I am guessing the EQ in the model # means it is an equitorial telescope.  Did I get a decent deal, and can I still get things like different eyepieces and such to make it better, and if so, anyone got any idea where?  Thanks in advance for all your help, and I look forward to becoming a part of the skygazing community.  Peace! :)
"George Washington's brother was the Uncle of Our Country"-George Carlin-R.I.P.

#2 bugzilla

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 06:46 AM

So will any eyepiece fit it?  Are there any that would make it better?  Does anyone have any answers for me?  Or are you all so stuck on your fancy expensive new scopes that you don't have time to deal with someone who is just starting out with an old scope with the hopes of getting a really good scope someday?  I don't like being ignored.
"George Washington's brother was the Uncle of Our Country"-George Carlin-R.I.P.

#3 wsuriano

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 01:50 PM

I'm not familiar with that model of telescope or its mount at all, but you can't beat $35!  If the eyepiece is removable then other eyepieces can be used.  The size of the eyepiece barrell is critical.  Is it 1.25" or .963"?  With a 25mm eyepiece, you are getting 36X magnification (900mm/25mm).  Your theoretic maximum magnification (assuming great seeing) is about 130X (40 to 50 times the diameter of your primary mirror in inches).  So, theoretically, you could use an eyepice with considerably more power, especially if you're looking at planets and the moon, which beg for more power.  You can get eyepieces from any astronomy store on-line.  I am partial to optcorp.com, but there are many other places on-line that sell accessories.  Keep in mind, that, as you increase the power, all the factors that limit your ability to see are also magnified.  So, don't go all the way to the theoretical limit.  You might want to try an second eyepiece somewhere between 10 and 15 mm.  You might want to consider a Meade Series 4000 15mm Plossl.  They're not expensive ($45) and have good quality.  See, http://www.optcorp.c...d=30-718-46-48.

By the way, you'll find on this forum, as others, that people are very willing to help out, especially to help out newbies.  Just be patient.

#4 bugzilla

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 01:58 PM

That's the kind of info I was looking for.  Thank you.  It just bothers me that the thread had like 30 hits, and no replies at all.  I will have to save a little, but I plan on getting the 4000 series collection and see which ones are best for this model.  I know some of them won't be very good for the scope I have now, but I do plan on getting a better scope and mount on down the line.  Once again, thank you.
"George Washington's brother was the Uncle of Our Country"-George Carlin-R.I.P.

#5 wsuriano

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 03:01 PM

No problem.  I found the manual for your scope on the Meade site.  You can find it at www.meade.com/manuals/TelescopeManuals/Polaris/Polaris60EQ-D.pdf.  It does take .965" eyepieces, so take care in what you buy.  For the time being, you may want to limit your comittment to the .965" format.  You could buy an adapter, but you may not be satisfied with the results of using a 1.25" eyepiece in a .965" barrell.

#6 swholden

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 03:13 PM

Hmmmm.....I know I replied here, but don't see my post.

Welcome bugzille. wsuriano is right........you only find people here who are willing to help. After all, we all were new at one time, right?

The is a warning to this hobby........It's addicting!! So doctor supervision is recommended. :)

Anyway, don be shy in asking people for recommendations of places to buy from either. Check out Craig's List for your area, I've seen some good stuff in my area. Also, if you like, check out my site (in my signature below), you'll find some links to sites I've bought from in the past, and my thoughts about each. All have been positive. I've only found people willing to help my advance in my new hobby. No one just trying to make a dime off me.

So, good luck and clear skies. You picked a great time to get started! Be sure to check out Jupiter. It's at it's finest, and even with a 26mm eye piece, you'll seen some moons and weather/heat permitting, may even see some bands. Jupitur is what got me hook. (You can read about it on my site).

Again, don't be afraid to ask.....that's what we're all here for!
<b>Visit Me at:

www.thewyattfamily.org/astronomy
or
http://stevensastron...ogspot.com/</b>

Click to view my sky conditions (Worcester, MA):
<a href=http://cleardarksky.com/c/AnnMrCllgMAkey.html> <img src="http://cleardarksky....cs0.gif?1"></a>

I'm a Meade 4M Supporti

#7 Philip Pugh

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 01:35 PM

I have a telescope of the same genre but a different make. They are often much maligned but I used one happily for 8 years and the only reason its semi-retired is that I now own better telescopes. I got some better quality eyepieces from a Celestron dealer in the UK, which greatly improved the performance.

You will certainly see the 2 main cloud belts on Jupiter (sometimes 3) and all Galilean moons, as long as they are not behind the planet, in front of it or in its shadow. You can also see Saturn's rings and Titan and some surface markings on Mars when near opposition.

Now I paid £87 for mine, probably about $200 in today's money but if I think of the hours I spent using it and the experience it gave me, it must surely rate as one of my best buys.

You may well consign it to the attic in a few years' time if you decide to go for a larger telescope but then its less than the cost of a meal out for 2.

I haven't tried photography with mine as I had a 127mm Maksutov before a digital camera.

#8 bugzilla

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 08:14 AM

I saw Jupiter last night!  Didn't get  any detail because of the relativly weak power of the eyepiece, but I did see several of the moons.  I can't wait to get better eyepieces so I can really get a good look at the sky, but money is pretty much nil right now.  We just moved here and got a new truck, so the funds are stretched pretty thin.  If anyone has any .965" eyepieces they don't happen to be using anymore and are willing to donate to a newbie I can send you my address.  If you want to sell them REALLY cheap, we may be able to work something out.  Thanks for all your help so far.
"George Washington's brother was the Uncle of Our Country"-George Carlin-R.I.P.

#9 skywise

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Posted 28 July 2008 - 01:58 PM

I found myself in a similar situation many years ago - with a used scope that uses the smaller eyepieces. I puchased the adapter and some 1.25" Plossls. Number 1, the difference in the images was striking. Number 2, when I eventually bought a bigger scope, I already had some decent eyepieces to go with it. Number 3, when I eventually got a Nagler or two, the old eyepieces still came in handy for those public outreach star parties in the park. The first time you see someone clean mascara off a Nagler you'll get my drift.
Brad Snowder
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Western Washington University

#10 Philip Pugh

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 07:10 PM

60mm refractors are got for double star observation.

#11 bugzilla

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 07:44 PM

60mm refractors are got for double star observation.

O.K....I don't really understand what you mean by that, but nevermind all that.  I just got me a Meade ETX-80AT!  Came with two eyepieces, a 25 and 26mm, and a 45 degree flip mirror.  Just saw Jupiter, and boy was it pretty!
"George Washington's brother was the Uncle of Our Country"-George Carlin-R.I.P.

#12 wsuriano

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 06:57 AM

Yay!  Depending on how dark your skies are, you have many more things to look at.  I would start with some of the brighter clusters.  There's also a good book for beginning named "Turn Left at Orion."  I highly recommend it.  It gives you good things to look at during each season and shows you just what to expect in your eyepiece at various magnifications.

#13 Philip Pugh

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 11:16 AM

60mm refractors are got for double star observation.

O.K....I don't really understand what you mean by that, but nevermind all that.  I just got me a Meade ETX-80AT!  Came with two eyepieces, a 25 and 26mm, and a 45 degree flip mirror.  Just saw Jupiter, and boy was it pretty!


Sorry, typo: "got" should be "good".

#14 skywise

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 12:36 PM

Sorry, typo: "got" should be "good".


It works both ways.
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Western Washington University

#15 bugzilla

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 07:04 PM

Sorry, typo: "got" should be "good".

;D :o :) Gotcha! ;D
"George Washington's brother was the Uncle of Our Country"-George Carlin-R.I.P.

#16 Philip Pugh

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 03:37 PM

Sorry, typo: "got" should be "good".

??? :o 8) Gotcha! ;D


I've never claimed to be an accurate typist.

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 09:16 PM

Another one that' gets hook just like me. ;)

#18 Philip Pugh

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 07:32 PM

You might find this useful:

http://philippugh.fo...com/bindex.html

Also, please let me know if anyone has some good website links for beginners or any more recommended books.




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