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Sunday May 25th was Egg-citing


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#1 Larry Alvarez

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 05:07 AM

Hello everyone.  Sunday the viewing was pretty good for a couple hours.  The clouds rolled in and washed out the sun but I did get the images attached.  There was a small active area on the disk that appeared to be a couple of small spots.

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#2 Falcon

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Posted 29 May 2008 - 05:47 PM

Hello larry,

You would think the images of the sun would become repetative, but each image is unique like a snowflake. We may get only 60 days of total sunshine in Erie, but we get a ton of snowflakes. And they add up quickly. We are about 90 miles from Buffalo, NY.

Keep posting your work and thanks for the time you take to share it online.

Do you have a website with all your images?

I understand Lunt is in preproduction of a 60mm Solarscope. Do you think it is comparable to Coronado's 60mm? Does this explain the price reduction? Still the Lunt is $899 vs $1999 for the Coronado. I plan to purchase one of the models, any suggestions?

Larry

PS: I know this is a Coronado group and they say Meade does not moniter it. Lets see?

#3 Larry Alvarez

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 08:47 AM

On the subject of which is better, I truely don't know because the Lunt telescopes/filters have not shipped yet.  When looking into a scope or filter for H-alpha what you want to consider are:
1. Eveness across the field of view
2. band pass
3. aperture
4. portablity
5. build and function
6. Warranty
7. Cost
8. ease of use

Cost is typically one of the most important things to most folks, especially in these days of 5$ a gallon gas and skyrocketing cost for everything else.  I think that the new Lunt scopes are probably one of the best things to come around lately because they provide a balance to the solar filter market and make all parties innovate to keep up with the other.  Any scope that can hit <.5 ~ <1 angstrom it going to be a good one because it takes alot of discipline to create.  The angstrom is an incredible target to hit and to do it repeatedly in a manufacturing environment requires alot of process control. 

Keep in mind that one companies <.5 could be another <.7.  One example of this is Daystar's filters.  They have images on their website showing <.5 images but they are not comparible to Coronado's <.5 images.  They come closer to the <.7.  Which is correct?  I'm not sure.  You can do the math but I think when working with these small of tolerances there will undoubtedly be alot of variation in the final resulting filter system.  Hence, you sometimes hear folks say their PST performs like a <.7 scope. 

Upon comparing the two scopes, Lunt 60 and MaxScope 60 there are some immediate similarities and differences:
Similarities -
Both claim <.7 ~ <.8 for a single
Both provide views in H-alpha
Both were designed and concieved by a member of the Lunt family
Both provide a full disk view of the sun
Both have a 60mm aperture

MaxScope -                                                    Lunt 60mm Telescope-
front etalon design with rear blocking filter        Rear etalon with rear blocking filter
Large 60mm etalon element                            Small etalon probably between 40~30mm
Aperture:                  60mm                            Aperture:                60mm
Focal Length:            400mm                            Focal Length:          500mm
F/Ratio:                    F/6.6                              F/Ratio:                  Not listed
Bandwidth:              <0.7Å                              Bandwidth:              <.8Å
Thermal Stability:    0.005 Å/°C                      Thermal Stability: Not listed
Safety Blocking:      >10-5 from EUV/IR            Safety Blockign: Not listed
Blocking filter aperture: 10mm                          Blocking filter aperture: 6mm
Greatest strength: Large front etalon                Greatest strength: Price
Focuser:                Helical style                        Focuser:            Dual rate crayford
Front Lens:            Achromat                            Front lens:          Singlet

As the Coronado scopes are more mature, the expected data on them is known where as the Lunt telescopes still have yet to be proven by a mass market of people.  Ultimately the view is what matters.  It is my opinion that front mounted etalons are better because they take in unaltered light from the Sun where as internal units rely more on proper lensing to achieve a good parallel beam.  This is probably one reason for the <.8 spec for the Lunt scope.  The front mounted etalons are harder to build though because keeping the correct spacing between them is harder due to the increased surface area.  Hence you will hear alot of folks say its as much an art to build one as it is a science. 

Because the view is of <.8 H-alpha (monochrome) a heavy duty apo lens is not needed.  The question then becomes does it make a difference?  I think that we will soon see when the Lunt telescopes come out.  I have heard from owners of high dollar scopes that they do make a difference.  From my own experience I can say that it depends so much on the seeing conditions that its all relative.  Personally I own alot of cheap ol' achromats but at the same time, even though they work good I'd like to get a Triplet but just haven't saved up for a good one yet. 

The price reduction is more than likely based on Coronado's competition with the new Lunt scope prices.  I think that because Coronado uses front mounted Etalons and their scopes are milled, this is what is inducing alot of costs.  The Coronado scope is like a scope that was built from the ground up. Everything was designed on it.  The Lunt scopes are using some 3rd party parts to help reduce costs.  One example is the focuser.  The Lunt scopes have a focuser that appears to look alot like the GSO style units I have seen while the Coronado style focuers are odd helical style focusers that I have only see on Borg type telescopes.  They are definitely made only for these telescopes.  I am sure once the Lunt scopes come out we will hear more on them and how they work and how good/bad they are.

My advice to you would be to get the best scope that you can afford without going broke.  Save a little for the accessories that you'll want and buy responsibly.  I lean toward Coronado at this time because I like the quality of their front mounted etalons and the quality of the scopes.  They don't have the best focuser but their scope just feels good and is extremely solid and proven.  I am also interested in the other scopes just like everyone else and will make my determination on which is better for me when they come out later this year but I know that it will take a few years to really determine how the new stuff holds up.

Clear Skyz, LA

#4 Falcon

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Posted 30 May 2008 - 10:22 AM

Your answer could fill a chapter in your new book on choosing scopes.
It is  knowledgable, unbiased and gave me a lot to think about when I make my purchase.

Thank you for the time and effort of your reply.

Sincerely,

Larry K

#5 Falcon

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 06:38 PM

Hello Larry,

Do you have any advise concerning the Coronado 60 vs the Lunt 60 now that they have been in production? Currently I have a PST and would like to upgrade to a 60mm double stack solar telescope. I have a Canon 20Da and I am considering trying imaging.

I appreciated your advise last May 2008 and would appreciate any update.

Thank you,

Larry Kuklinski




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